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Increasing Self-Awareness & Understanding Team Relationships Part II

Increasing Self-Awareness & Understanding Team Relationships Part II

Written by Pamela Valencia, Solutions Consultant, CPP Professional Services

(If you didn’t get a chance to read Part I of this post, you can read it here.)

 

Thinking–Feeling on the ‘Type Head Team’

The way we prefer to make decisions—using Thinking (based on logical analysis) or Feeling (empathetically)—also plays into the relationships on a team. In our team example, half prefer Thinking and half prefer Feeling. Is there harmony on the team? Is everyone treated fairly as an individual? These questions are important to people who have a preference for Feeling. People who have a preference for Thinking may be more focused on tasks and want to make decisions based on everyone being treated the same (no individuals treated differently based on circumstances). Conflicts often arise on a team when decisions need to be made. With Thinking and Feeling preferences, the information being considered in making the decision would differ between preferences.

Team Type

Judging–Perceiving on the ‘Type Head Team’

Last but not least, let’s turn to the preferences having to do with how people deal with the outer world—Judging (living life in a planned, orderly way) and Perceiving (living life in a flexible, spontaneous way). In our team example, everyone has a preference for Judging. People who have a preference for Judging tend to strive for closure and enjoy planning out their day and having goals, checklists, and so on, while people who have a preference for Perceiving want flexibility in their work and enjoy leaving tasks open to last-minute changes that occur. You might think that because everyone on the team has a preference for Judging no conflict occurs, but that’s not always the case.

 

If a preference is missing on a team or in a relationship (such as the missing Perceiving preference in our team example above), often a member will “flex” his or her type and take on the role of the missing preference to help the team be more effective. In our team example, one member may flex to represent the Perceiving preference, attempting to slow down the rush to closure by playing devil’s advocate or suggesting that the team think on a decision until the following week. Or that person may show flexibility by changing direction quickly even though he or she would prefer to work the plan. This can cause stress for those who consistently flex their style to support their team by recognizing the team’s need and that stress can lead to conflicts within the team. On the other hand, if no one on the team takes on this balancing role, the team may find itself frequently rushing to closure or being unwilling to make changes to the plan/goal/process when opportunities arise.

 

Identifying your own MBTI type preferences and knowing your team type is one of the first steps in building effective teams and understanding how conflict can arise within the team. Relationships, whether personal or professional, are simply a ‘team of two.’ If you’re interested in investing in your own team or employees, contact CPP Professional Services to discuss how your workplace or team could benefit from the improved communication, increased self-awareness and reduced conflict that the MBTI can bring with our customized workshop solutions.

 

If you already know your Myers-Briggs type and type preference within teams is something you’re interested in for your employees or clients, check out the Introduction to Type® & Teams booklet here.

 

This post is part of a series on Relationships, Connections and Conflict. Read the next blog post in the series: Understanding Team Relationships & Myers-Briggs Conflict Pairs

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  1. Increasing Self-Awareness & Understanding Team Relationships with the MBTI® Assessment | CPP Blog - [...] Curious about how our team interactions occur on the Type Head Team from the Thinking-Feeling and Judging-Perceiving preference perspectives? …
  2. Increasing Self-Awareness & Understanding Team Relationships with the MBTI® Assessment | CPP Blog - [...] Curious about how our team interactions occur on the Type Head Team from the Thinking-Feeling and Judging-Perceiving preference perspectives? Take …
  3. The Self-Aware Student, Part I | CPP Blog - [...] your MBTI® personality type preferences can shed light on these questions by empowering you with self-awareness—knowledge of not only …

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