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MBTI Step II Thinking-Feeling Facets: The Importance of Facet Order

Aug 14, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

If you want to start this series from the beginning, take a look at the first few blogs here, here and here. When interpreting MBTI® Step II™ Interpretive Report results, practitioners tend to forget about the importance of the order of the facets (see MBTI® Step II™ Manual, pp. 22–23). We know that the first T–F facet, Logical–Empathetic, is the starting point for decision making, with the remaining facets (Reasonable–Compassionate, Questioning–Accommodating, Critical–Accepting, and Tough–Tender) following in order. While both of the first two facets report a high percentage of in-preference results, we often find that the first facet represents the decision-making style we think we should use. The second facet is likely our actual decision-making style. For example, when a client reports Logical on the first facet and Compassionate on the second facet, be sure to ask the client about this difference. Why might this difference from ideal to actual occur? Who in this person’s life (past or present) might be influencing this result? How might this difference help or hinder the person’s decision-making approach? I’ve witnessed many clients’ “aha!” moments when they look at the Thinking–Feeling facets in light of this additional information. In the next blog we’re going to cover the last two sets of facets in the Thinking-Feeling preference pair: Critical–Accepting, and Tough–Tender. As a reminder, if you need a quick overview of all the facets, you can take a look at this video I put together (and even click through to certain sections if that’s all you want to watch). Also, if you haven’t seen our new feedback cards, we’re offering this new product for both the Step I and Step II assessments. You can learn more about this new product to help practitioners give feedback for the MBTI Step II facets here and then take a look at the “how to” video...

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Team Building with the MBTI Step II Thinking-Feeling Facets

Aug 2, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

There is just so much depth with the Thinking–Feeling facets that many people only begin to explore. During the MBTI® Certification Program, I take participants through several decision-making stages—T–F facet by T–F facet. A participant asked me this week how I keep things from getting out of hand when I go through this process with working teams. She realized that it can be a powerful experience for teams and things can get a bit heated. While I don’t feel especially comfortable with conflict, I replied that sometimes you want to encourage getting those uncomfortable words out in the open so they can finally get addressed. As the facilitator of such a team-building experience, I need to work hard when conflict erupts to keep each side as open as possible to hearing what the other side has to say. I need to call out both verbal (disrespectful comments) and nonverbal (eye rolling, dismissive nodding, arm crossing) communication from team members and challenge everyone in the room to find productive ways to understand and appreciate the differences we all bring to the table. This doesn’t mean that I always succeed in getting people to completely agree. However, if I can get team members to start to hear each other’s decision-making differences, then that team is moving in the right direction. The MBTI Team Report can also come in handy here because it provides a good checklist of things for teams to keep in mind whenever they make decisions, as does drawing a team type...

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MBTI Step II Facets: Can We Be Too Accommodating?

Jul 19, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

If you missed it, you can see the first blog post in this series here and the post on the other side of this facet, Questioning, here. I often ask people who report Accommodating on the MBTI® Step II™ Interpretive Report if they are too accommodating. Usually, the reply is a straightforward and accommodating “yes!” Accommodating people tend to pick their battles when faced with differences of opinion. As a result, they are sometimes seen as “wishy-washy” and as pushovers. When we accommodate too much, it might even look like we don’t care—not good if we want to be part of the decision-making process in the future. For those of us who are Accommodating, it can be very difficult to suddenly switch gears. I know when I try not to accommodate and my point of view is questioned, I just can’t help but see the other side (just like you can flex your MBTI preferences, you or your client can also practice flexing your MBTI Step II facets). This makes it difficult for me to continue to question. It might look like I’m just giving in, but I’m not. My coaching takeaway is that I need to clarify why I agree in a clear and logical way to better get my point across while also keeping in the forefront what I might have disagreed with in the first place. Want to learn more about flexing Step II Facets? Take a look at the eBook we created to explain that here. Specifically, see page 17 onward to read about flexing the Questioning and Accommodating facets. Question: In the MBTI® Certification Program, I teach three reasons why the Questioning–Accommodating facet is often out-of-preference. Do you know what those three reasons...

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MBTI Step II Questioning Facet: In-Preference and Out-of-Preference

Jul 5, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

If you missed the first blog in this series, check out the overview here. Or you can watch this video that covers all 20 MBTI Step II facets. As I mentioned previously, we’re going to cover the Thinking-Feeling facets first starting with Questioning and Accommodating. This facet in particular deals with how a person responds to differences in a point of view. Questioning in-preference can come off as a bit harsh at times. I tell a story in my MBTI® Certification Program about a participant who started every question with the phrase “But you said…” while holding up her index finger. When I brought this to her attention, she denied that she asked questions that way but then looked around the room to see others confirming that this was true. With some coaching from other participants, she learned to ask questions another way. She now starts them like this: “Help me understand….” Another participant tapped—and at times pounded her fist—on the table as she asked questions (I learned to stop jumping after the first few times this happened). Again, this person was not even aware of it, but when we brought it up she caught herself as she asked her next question. Just bringing this behavior to her attention helped her see that asking questions this way may not be getting her the answers she wants and needs. Out-of-preference Questioning behavior often looks a bit different. Have you ever noticed how some people ask a question in an apologetic way? They look like they’re sorry they’re asking the question but can’t help but ask it. I sometimes ask these people whether they have been given feedback from others that they ask too many questions and, if so, how that makes them feel. Typically, they say yes, and that they feel like they’re being a burden. So for them, asking questions feels uncomfortable. And yet, they still need to ask their question. I remind them that asking questions is a valuable way for them to make decisions but that this inconsistency in behavior (people with a preference for Feeling tend to report on the Accommodating side of the facet) can lead to confusion and even mistrust from others.  People with midzone results on Questioning–Accommodating tend to ask lots of questions on topics that are of particular interest to them but fewer to none in areas that are not as interesting....

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MBTI Step II Facets: An Overview

Jun 20, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In the next few blog entries I will give you my take on the MBTI® Step II™ facets. Those of you who have been through CPP’s MBTI Certification Program know what an interesting day exploring the facets in more detail can be. While the facets don’t cover every characteristic of each dichotomy, they are “important and significant subsets,” as one participant expressed it. We have to remember that the facet results don’t add up to the dichotomies, and therefore some clients could have more out-of-preference facets than in-preference facets on any dichotomy. While this can happen on Extraversion–Introversion, Sensing–Intuition, and Judging–Perception, it will most likely occur on Thinking–Feeling. For that reason, I will explore the Thinking–Feeling facets first. (Other than that, I’m not going to write in any particular order; instead, I’ll rely on my Emergent style—Methodical–Emergent is a Judging–Perceiving facet—and just let it flow.) As you work with individuals to help them improve essential components of their professional development, it’s important that they understand how to combine different aspects of their individual MBTI Step II facet results and learn the most appropriate ways for them to flex their preferences. And in case you’re looking for a little more reading material on the MBTI Step II facets, here are two complimentary eBooks that offer ideas and tips for using Step II results to increase your people’s self-awareness and understanding: “How to Manage Seemingly Contradictory Facet Results on the MBTI® Step II™ Assessment” “Flexing MBTI® Step II™ Facets Appropriately to Maximize Effectiveness” Lastly, we’ve mentioned this in previous blogs but we do have a few new products that have been refreshed for a more modern aesthetic and user-friendly visuals, which includes some of our MBTI Step II products. To learn more about these refreshed MBTI Step II products,...

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Leadership and the Intuition–Thinking (NT) Process Pair

Jun 6, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 1 comment

People with NT preferences (INTJs, INTPs, ENTPs, ENTJs) typically take a “what else can we do” approach to leadership. They tend to consider new ways to address tasks and projects, and often have an innovative mind-set that is about changing things up to make a situation better. If NT informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your open approach to new ideas and possibilities, but others may find what they see as change for the sake of change too impractical and lacking consideration of how it’s affecting others. Remember, changing things just because you are bored doing them the same way all the time can be very aggravating to people who appreciate stability and consistency. If NT informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you feel stuck in a rut and not sure what to try next. Don’t take it personally or assume your NT leader doesn’t appreciate your work just because every solution you offer is not met with rapt attention or accepted. Now that we’ve talked a bit about those two middle letters, let’s look at leaders with each of the four-letter MBTI personality types that contains that process pair: INTJ Preference Leaders We find a moderate number of leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer INTJ make up almost 6% of leaders, while representing only 2% of the general population. Their preferences may help them prepare for long-term possibilities and then organize decisions logically. During initial stress, however, they may start to imagine patterns or connections where they don’t exist. INTP Preference Leaders We find a moderate number of leaders of this type. People who prefer INTP make up almost 6% of leaders, while representing only 3% of the general population. Their preferences may help them analyze the pros and cons of a situation and then to anticipate the long-term outcomes. During initial stress they may become overly critical of others and can come across as feeling superior. ENTP Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type around the world. People who prefer ENTP make up over 8% of leaders, while representing only 3% of the general population. Their preferences may help them come up with a variety of short-term...

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Leadership and the Intuition–Feeling (NF) Process Pair

May 30, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with NF preferences (INFJs, INFPs, ENFPs, ENFJs) typically take a “let’s make a difference” approach to leadership. They consider how others can be positively affected over the long term instead of just in the present moment. In leading they tend to focus on big-picture, future-oriented ideas that can empower people to “be better.” If NF informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your support of their big-picture ideas, [OK?] but others may find your approach too pie-in-the-sky and not directive enough. Remember, some people need detailed, step-by-step instructions to know what you really want from them. If NF informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble coming up with new ways to make a difference. Try not to get impatient when your NF leader is exploring possibilities that seem unrealistic to you. Let’s take a quick look at each of these four-letter MBTI types and their leadership attributes: INFJ Preference Leaders Another one of the rarest of the leadership types, people who prefer INFJ make up only 2% of leaders around the world. Part of this could be that, at under 2% of the general population, they represent the smallest percentage of the population anyway. Again, just because we don’t find a lot of people who prefer INFJ in leadership positions does not mean they cannot make outstanding leaders. Their preferences may help them recognize long-term, big-picture possibilities as well as how their decisions affect others. During initial stress they may start to think everyone is against them and then withdraw emotionally. INFP Preference Leaders Not one of the more common leadership types, people who prefer INFP make up about 3% of leaders around the world. Their preferences may help them hold themselves and their organization to their values as well as consider many approaches to learning new things. During initial stress they may start to feel sorry for themselves as well as get a bit “preachy.” My own preferences are for INFP, and I like leadership opportunities where I can inspire others. I can get discouraged when people get overly critical and get bogged down in details. ENFP Preference Leaders People who prefer ENFP make up almost 7% of leaders. Interestingly, the workshop I delivered this month with 41 CEOs...

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Leadership and the Sensing–Feeling (SF) Process Pair

May 23, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with SF preferences (ISFJs, ISFPs, ESFPs, ESFJs) typically take a “thoughtful helping of others” approach to leadership. They consider how the factual information they provide (who, what when, why, where) might help others in a here-and-now way. They tend to have a supportive and practical leadership style, offering information that can be useful today instead of someday. If SF informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your detailed and helpful leadership style, but others may find your approach too restrictive and closed to new, less than concrete ideas. Remember, some people feel empowered when they get to explore possibilities, whether they act on these ideas or not. If ST informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble making your big-picture idea a reality. Try not to get annoyed when your ST leader wants you take a more practical and grounded approach to it. Let’s take a quick look at each of these four-letter MBTI types and their leadership attributes: ISFJ Preference Leaders Not one of the more common leadership types, people who prefer ISFJ make up almost 4% of leaders around the world. By the way, they make up almost 14% of the general population (the highest percentage of any of the types in the general population). Their preferences may help them take information from what they have learned in the past and apply it in the present in practical ways that are considerate of others. During initial stress they may trust only past experience, using language like “that’s not how we do it around here” and have difficulty considering new ways to tackle problems. ISFP Preference Leaders One of the rarest of the leadership types, people who prefer ISFP make up almost 2% of leaders around the world. Now, just because we don’t find a lot of people who prefer ISFP in leadership positions does not mean they cannot make outstanding leaders—we know that leaders often promote others who are just like them. Their preferences may help them stick to values that are important to leading an organization, as well as understand the practical reality of new ideas. During initial stress we might find them withdrawing emotionally and sinking into self-pity. ESFP Preference Leaders Another one of the rarest leadership...

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Leadership and the Sensing–Thinking (ST) Process Pair

May 16, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with ST preferences (ISTJs, ISTPs, ESTPs, ESTJs) typically take a “let’s get it done” approach to leadership. They want to tackle the task at hand and prefer to jump right in to get things right the first time. In fact, they are likely to be annoyed by discussion of matters that don’t directly relate to the task. They prefer to move on from anything they consider superfluous and get to what “needs” to get done. If ST informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your steady focus on the bottom line, but others may find your approach too task focused and therefore unappreciative of the people getting the task done. Remember, people are always a key factor of any successful undertaking. If ST informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that mimicking this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble focusing on the factual details of the problem to be addressed. And try not to take it personally or assume that your ST boss doesn’t like you just because she doesn’t seem interested in anything beyond the task at hand. Let’s take a quick look at the four MBTI personality types that have these two middle letters and find out how prominent they are as a percentage of leadership as well as a quick overview of their strengths and weaknesses: ISTJ Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer ISTJ make up over 15% of leaders. Their preferences may help them remember data and details from past experiences and then use them to make logical and efficient decisions. During initial stress, however, they may seem a bit rigid and not open to new ideas. ISTP Preference Leaders While not one of the most common leadership types, people who prefer ISTP are not the rarest either—they make up 5% of leaders around the world. Their preferences may help them during decision making better analyze both the pros and cons, and focus on the practicality of new ideas. During initial stress, however, they may start to look overly critical and stubborn. ESTJ Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer ESTJ make up...

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Myers-Briggs Personality Types and Leadership

May 11, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

A couple of years back I wrote a blog series on type and leadership, and I’m now following that up with a few additional ideas focusing on the MBTI® process pairs: ST, SF, NF, and NT. While the T–F and J–P preference pairs are the ones most often explored in relation to leadership (maybe I’ll write about the TJ, TP, FJ, and FP pairs next), I still like looking at the middle letters of people’s four-letter type the most. As you consider the content of this next series, remember that people of any type can be a successful leader if they have the motivation. Each type just leads in a different way. As we teach in our MBTI® Certification Program, the best leaders are those who know how to flex to the needs of their followers. I can think of times in my past when I was seen as a wonderful leader by some and a not-so-wonderful leader by others. A lot of it had to do with how willing I was to flex to the needs of the people I was leading. By the way, CPP has an excellent booklet on this very topic, titled Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type and Leadership and a new ready-to-present training workshop: Leader Development: An MBTI® Step I™ Type Training Workshop In addition, CPP has a lot of complimentary resources surrounding MBTI personality type and leadership. A few of these are listed below if you want to brush up on your MBTI type and leadership knowledge as we go through the series, or if perhaps you want to check out these resources for the first time. Coaching Transformational Leaders with the Myers-Briggs Assessment [white paper] Creating Inspirational Leaders: Beginning to Build Competencies in Today’s Leaders [webinar recording and slides] Leadership Development within the Organization [short video] Leadership Longevity: Addressing Needs Throughout the Employee Life Cycle [webinar recording] How Personality Type Affects Leadership Style [Fast Company article] Stay tuned for the first of four posts on type and leadership in this blog series …  ...

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