Pages Navigation Menu
Categories Navigation Menu

Have a Seat: E and I (How to manage stress once you’re actually in the interview)

Have a Seat: E and I (How to manage stress once you’re actually in the interview)

10-part series by Patrick Kerwin, MBTI® Master Practitioner, with some great tips on how students can manage stress. 

Have a Seat: E and I

Once you hear the words “Have a seat,” then it’s show time and the interview begins! Not all interviews are stressful, but there are different interview questions or situations that can provoke anxiety, unease, or stress in different types. Knowing the kind of questions or situations that might stress out your type will help you anticipate how to respond to them. Let’s start off by examining what kinds of questions or situations can trigger stress for Extraverts (Es) and Introverts (Is).

For Es: A common stress-provoking situation for Es is when the interviewer is quiet or uses few words. That silence and space can create anxiety for Es, causing them to think, “What’s going wrong?” or, “I don’t think they like me!” Then a common reaction for Es is to start talking even more to fill the space, which just makes things worse. If you have a preference for Extraversion and find yourself in an interview situation like that, take a breath and slowly count to ten, reminding yourself that the interviewer simply might have a preference for Introversion and that the interview could in fact be going just fine.

For Is: A common stress-provoking situation for Is tends to be the opposite situation: when the interviewer is very talkative or when there are multiple interviewers asking multiple questions. All of that external stimulation can be overwhelming for Is, sometimes causing them to lose track of the question or their train of thought. Then a common reaction for Is is to either just start spilling out words or to completely shut down, which just makes things worse. If you have a preference for Introversion and find yourself facing an overly talkative interviewer, try saying something like, “That’s a really thought-provoking question. Give me a few moments to think that over.” Then take your few moments, gather your thoughts, and provide your response. In the case of multiple interviewers, trying saying, “You all have a lot of really good questions. Let me answer this one, and then I might ask for your help in reminding me of the others when I’m done.”

It’s these little things that can keep you from getting stressed when you’re in the interview chair! In the next blog we’ll continue by examining the Sensing and Intuition preferences.

 

Read Patrick Kerwin’s previous blog: Pre-Interview Jitters

Read Patrick Kerwin’s next blog: Have a Seat: S and N

 

No Comments

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pre-Interview Jitters | CPP Blog - [...] Read Patrick Kerwin’s next blog: Have a Seat: E and I (How to manage stress once you’re actually in the …
  2. Have a Seat: S and N (How to manage stress once you’re actually in the interview) | CPP Blog - [...] the last blog on interviewing and stress, we looked at the kind of interview questions and situations that can …

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Feedback
Your message was successfully sent!



8 + 10 =