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Dealing with Difficult Professors, Part II

Dealing with Difficult Professors, Part II

10-part series by Patrick Kerwin, MBTI® Master Practitioner, with some great tips on how students can manage conflict.

In the previous blog post we discussed how a “difficult” professor might just be a professor with a personality type different from yours. We started by looking at your MBTI® type and what that might mean about your learning style. In this blog we’ll take a look at your professors and examine the likely instruction styles of different types.

Just as the two middle letters of your type influence how you like to learn, they also influence how a professor likely prefers to instruct. As you read the descriptions below, think about a professor you’d describe as a “difficult” professor. See if you can identify his or her style below.

Professors whose two middle letters are ST are often factual, logical, and to the point. They tend to be most interested in straightforward discussions that involve specifics and logic, and can often be found teaching subjects such as accounting, engineering, or some other subject with clear rules and guidelines.

Professors whose two middle letters are SF are often detailed, specific, and kind. They tend to be most interested in pleasant discussions that involve real, tangible information that helps people in a practical way, and can often be found teaching subjects such as nursing, education, or some other subject that provides a service to others.

Professors whose two middle letters are NF are often exploratory and focus on people and the big picture. They tend to be most interested in positive discussions about ideas or situations that affect people, and can often be found teaching subjects such as English, psychology, or some other subject that helps people grow.

Professors whose two middle letters are NT are often theoretical, intellectual, and objective. They tend to be most interested in discussions or debates about concepts or theories that can be analyzed logically, and can often be found teaching subjects such as political science, one of the hard sciences, or some other subject that addresses complex problems.

Did you find what seems to be the type of your “difficult” professor? In the next blog we’ll look at ways to engage with a professor whose type is different from yours.

 

Read Patrick’s previous blog: Dealing with Difficult Professors, Part I

 

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  1. Students & Conflict | Blog Directory | CPP Blog - [...] Dealing with Difficult Professors, Part II [...]
  2. Dealing with Difficult Professors, Part III | CPP Blog - [...] type different from yours, and we examined your MBTI® type and your likely learning style. In the second blog …

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