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Framing your reintegration process to suit your needs

Framing your reintegration process to suit your needs

Managing the Transition Home – Post 6

Written by Katherine and Elizabeth Hirsh

In previous posts we’ve discussed various aspects of type—for example, the eight preferences and the Functions Lens—and in this post we’ll focus on another aspect of type called the Attitudes Lens. We’ll examine how knowledge of this Lens can help frame your reintegration journey. The Attitudes Lens is based on the first and fourth letters of your type code—E or I and J or P—known as the Attitudes, and this Lens focuses our attention on four ways of interacting with the world: through Introversion and Judging (IJ), through Introversion and Perceiving (IP), through Extraversion and Perceiving (EP), and through Extraversion and Judging (EJ).

Since we are focusing on just two letters, each of the four different pairings has something in common with two of the other pairings: IJ and IP share Introversion, EP and EJ share Extraversion, IJ and EJ share Judging, and IP and EP share Perceiving. Therefore, there are some similarities in how these groups approach reintegration, which you will notice in the suggestions below. Further, because neither IJ and EP nor IP and EJ have any letters in common, the differences between their approaches to reintegration may be easier to spot.

How can an awareness of the Attitudes Lens help you? It highlights where you tend to get your energy and how you typically arrange your life, as well as the strategies you may overlook. This understanding points to ways you can honor your particular needs and mitigate your blind spots while in transition.

People with preferences for IJ tend get their energy from their inner world and prefer to take a structured approach. If this is your style, you can improve your reintegration process by

  • Giving yourself time and space to reflect and think deeply
  • Devising plans that bring order, stability, and clarity to the reintegration process
  • Being careful not to over-analyze things or structure plans too tightly in your drive to have things be perfect

People with preferences for IP tend get their energy from their inner world and prefer to take an open-ended approach. If this is your style, you can improve your reintegration process by

  • Giving yourself time and space to reflect and think deeply
  • Allowing things to be fluid in order to keep the reintegration process flexible and responsive to new data
  • Being careful not to overanalyze things or keep plans too open in your drive to have things be perfect

People with preferences for EP tend get their energy from the outer world and prefer to take an open-ended approach. If this is your style, you can improve your reintegration process by

  • Giving yourself multiple opportunities to talk with others and try things out
  • Allowing things to be fluid in order to keep the reintegration process flexible and responsive to new data
  • Being careful not to overdo things or keep plans too open in your drive to get things moving

People with preferences for EJ tend get their energy from the outer world and prefer to take a structured approach. If this is your style, you can improve your reintegration process by

  • Giving yourself multiple opportunities to talk with others and try things out
  • Devising plans that bring order, stability, and clarity to the reintegration process
  • Being careful not to overdo things or structure plans too tightly in your drive to get things moving

LightbulbKnowing yourself better can help you frame your reintegration process so that it better suits your needs. Understanding your need for reflection or action, as well as for structure or openness, can light the way in what is often a confusing time. Recognizing how and where you may over- or underdo things can help you avoid getting stuck. Military service necessitated having a certain pace and order to your life; now it’s your turn to give yourself what you need to make your journey from soldier to civilian easier. You’ve sacrificed for others, now you deserve this for yourself!

You can learn more on the topic of psychological type and reintegration in our booklet Introduction to Type® and Reintegration.

Elizabeth and Katherine Hirsh are coauthors of several publications, including Introduction to Type® and Teams, MBTI® Teambuilding Program: Leader’s Resource Guide, Introduction to Type® and Decision Making, and the MBTI® Decision-Making Style Report.

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