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Finding your rhythm after service

Finding your rhythm after service

Managing your transition home – Part 8

Written by Elizabeth and Katherine Hirsh

In previous posts we’ve discussed various aspects of type, and in this post we cover another aspect called the Temperaments Lens. We examine how knowledge of this Lens, which focuses on what keeps people motivated, can help you find your rhythm after service so that you can order your reintegration process to best meet your needs. The Temperaments Lens uses two letters from the four-letter type code like the other Lenses we’ve discussed; however, its combinations are distinctive and don’t follow a standard pattern. The Temperaments Lens’ four groupings are: Sensing and Judging (SJ), Sensing and Perceiving (SP), Intuition and Thinking (NT), and Intuition and Feeling (NF).

How can an awareness of the Temperaments Lens help you? The Temperaments Lens offers insight into your natural rhythm as well as pointing to situations that could throw you out of sync. This information can help you let loved ones, colleagues, support professionals, friends, and others know what keeps you going strong during a transition and what may derail you.

 

 During the reintegration process, people with SJ preferences need others to understand their need for:

Traditional strategies that incorporate proven techniques

Life feels uncomfortable and out of sync for people with SJ preferences when there is a lack of:

Security and stability

 

During the reintegration process, people with SP preferences need others to understand their need for:

Practical strategies that incorporate fun and humor

Life feels uncomfortable and out of synch for people with SP preferences when there is a lack of:

Freedom and flexibility

 

During the reintegration process, people with NT preferences need others to understand their need for:

Logical strategies that incorporate the latest ideas

Life feels uncomfortable and out of synch for people with NT preferences when there is a lack of:

Objectivity and information

 

During the reintegration process, people with NF preferences need others to understand their need for:

People-centered strategies that incorporate caring and warmth

Life feels uncomfortable and out of synch for people with NF preferences when there is a lack of:

Empathy and imagination

 

Your time in service required you to fall in line with the military’s pace—and rightly so—­yet now it’s time to march to your own beat. Understanding what you need from others to operate optimally, as well as recognizing what may leave you feeling out of step, can help you create a life that is in harmony with who you are.

You can learn more about the topic of psychological type and reintegration in our booklet Introduction to Type® and Reintegration.

Elizabeth and Katherine Hirsh are coauthors of several publications, including Introduction to Type® and Teams, MBTI® Teambuilding Program: Leader’s Resource Guide, Introduction to Type® and Decision Making, and the MBTI® Decision-Making Style Report.

 

One Comment

  1. I find temperament to be the key to quickly understanding people. Your article is well done, although you’re just scratching the surface here, and I can see you write from the NF temperament point of view. I use the metaphor “Morale Officers” to describe people with the NF temperament.

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