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These Bosses Want to Know Your Type

Dec 20, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

This article was written by Christine Lagorio-Chafkin and originally appeared on Inc.com. To read the article on the original site, click here.  Get yourself hired at Clever, a seven-year-old marketing company, and as one of the first orders of business you’ll be flown out to San Francisco. You’ll meet the company’s founders, as well as a few colleagues. You’ll start in on fairly typical on-boarding activities — like plowing through all that HR paperwork. Then things start getting a little different. You’ll sit down and complete the 93-question Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which will diagnose you as one of 16 distinct personality types, and a StrengthsFinder assessment, which will surface talents of yours within its “language of 34 themes.” Will you bristle? That depends on whether you’ve already fallen in love with the unique culture at Clever. “Oh, we know we can come off sounding nuts,” says Clever co-founder Stefania Pomponi. “Business journals will pooh-pooh companies that use Myers-Briggs,” which dates from the 1920s, and was created by a mother-daughter pair inspired by the work of Carl Jung. “Consider that these are just data points in big buckets,” she continues. “And just fun.” The whole slate of tests is known internally as “Office Astrology.” Because, as co-founder Cat Lincoln says, everyone knows his or her sign. And, as with astrology, certain individuals find the whole exercise extremely useful, most find it amusing, and few take it entirely seriously. Lincoln is among those who find the slightly tongue-in-cheek diagnostics systems legitimately useful. “I’m an introvert. So I’m going to need a little more time to process something — and it’s good if others know that. Stefania is an extrovert, so she might want to talk out her thoughts.” Clever, as a company, is entirely virtual. It was founded as Clever Girls in 2009 by former grade-school friends Lincoln and Pomponi, along with Kristy Sammis, who is the company’s chief operations officer, creative director, and also has a co-founder title. It came of age alongside influencer marketing, which entails enlisting high-profile individuals to endorse products over social media. (Remember Batkid? Clever created the social-media campaign behind it.) While a bunch of Clever’s employees are based in the San Francisco Bay Area, most of the 50 staffers are scattered around the United States, working from home. This means Slack is the water cooler for Clever’s dozens of salespeople, creatives, and managers. It’s the...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Networking and the Step II™ Receiving Facet Challenge

Dec 15, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

The conference is in full swing. Walking from session to session, I’ve come across people I have worked with in past trainings over the years. I always worry at these events that someone will come up to me and call out my name, but I won’t remember theirs. I work with so many people each year, it is hard to commit everyone’s name to memory. Just yesterday, as I waited in the hotel lobby for my room to be ready, I noticed someone looking at me. Her face was very familiar, but I wasn’t sure why. She kept glancing over. I was so focused on when the person at the hotel registration desk would call me up to check in. As the person glancing at me walked out of the hotel lobby, she turned, smiled and said, “Hi, Michael.” Ahhh! I felt so bad that I wasn’t more focused. I made sure to walk up to her the next day and apologize. She was very nice about it. Thank goodness. These conferences provide lots of time for networking. Some people thrive in these environments. I tend not to. My strategy: show up a little late to make sure that someone I know will already be there. Then, once I arrive, ask if I can help with anything. This gives me something to do besides just standing there pretending that the plant next to me is the most interesting plant I have ever seen. Fortunately, there was a photo station at our first networking event. I walked around and just picked people to take pictures with. This gave me something to do and also was a great way to remember the event. The networking vibe is often perceived differently by people who report Initiating versus Receiving on the MBTI® Step IITM assessment. I report Receiving, which is in-preference for me because I prefer Introversion, and I find it fits me to a tee. Here are the descriptors from the MBTI® Step IITM Report for in-preference Receiving: Consider social obligations unimportant and leave them to others. Prefer in-depth discussion about important issues; hate small talk. May be seen by others as quiet and shy. Believe it is intrusive to set people up socially and don’t want others to do it for you. When making telephone calls, prefer to be alone, when receiving calls, see them as unwelcome interruptions. I couldn’t agree...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It’s Not Meant to Be Predictive

Dec 13, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

And finally, Patrick Kerwin shared the criticism that the MBTI® tool is not predictive of behavior. Guess, what? It’s not meant to predict behavior. Instead, the MBTI tool is about giving us some understanding around how we take in information (Perceiving processes of S-N) and make decisions (Judging processes of T-F). Isabel Briggs Myers called this “clearer perceptions” and “sounder judgments.” If you try to apply the MBTI tool beyond that, you are overstepping its purpose. So, yes…we agree. The MBTI tool does not predict behavior. However, we have plenty of very rich data showing that certain types are attracted to certain occupations, and it’s readily available. As one colleague in our Research division likes to say, “Just read the manual.” This attraction to careers by type can be invaluable in the career exploration process. I use the MBTI assessment as a career tool, but I always combine it with the Strong Interest Inventory® assessment. The MBTI tool helps me explore a client’s motivations, while the Strong adds vocational interests. Together, these tools can be very powerful for individuals engaged in career exploration. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Is Reliable MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Doesn’t Just Flatter You MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture Matters  ...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Is Reliable

Dec 8, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick addressed that the criticism that the MBTI tool isn’t reliable all tracks back to one article published in 1993, before the current form was even published. Data show that test-retest reliability for the MBTI tool is actually very good. When people get a different result on the assessment from one time to the next, it is usually because they reported “slight” the first time. With a result of “slight,” you could have answered just a few questions differently and reported toward the opposite preference. However, looking at that psychometrically, usually that’s just a few points difference, which is actually very good reliability. One critic of the assessment claimed that he took it one time and reported INTJ, and then took it again and reported ESFP (the exact opposite type). Our data show that this only happens when a person is not taking the assessment seriously or is purposely trying to get opposite results. The MBTI tool is not meant to trick you. But if you know enough about the theory, you know what the questions are getting at. That is one reason why we don’t suggest taking it over and over again. If you want to delve deeper, look at something called internal consistency reliability. For the MBTI tool, these numbers are excellent with different age groups and ethnicities, and by gender. Click here to check out some interesting reliability and validity data. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Doesn’t Just Flatter You MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Doesn’t Just Flatter You

Dec 6, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing my overview of Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference, Patrick noted that the criticism that the MBTI® tool just flatters people was somewhat odd. Those of us who know what the MBTI tool is really about know that it’s not a diagnostic tool. It’s not even a test. “Test” implies results of good and bad, pass or fail. The MBTI descriptions may indeed seem flattering at times. All of us bring something to every situation we are in. All of us have gifts. That may seem flattering. However, if we overuse those gifts, then things do not appear so flattering after all. For example, when I overuse my preferences for Intuition and Perceiving I can come across as a bit unfocused and even a little flighty. I like to ask people, “Are you using your preferences, or are your preferences using you?” If it’s the latter, then they may be coming across as a bit of a caricature of their preferences. I see this in people who overuse Extraversion or Introversion. Someone who overuses Extraversion may tend to overwhelm others in certain situations. Someone who overuses Introversion may tend to underwhelm situations. Neither example is very flattering. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / There is Plenty of Research

Dec 1, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing with Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference, Patrick addressed the criticism that the MBTI assessment is not in clinical psychology journals. He noted it’s not in clinical journals because it’s not a clinical tool. It doesn’t belong in clinical journals. A CPP board member didn’t use it in his published research for that very reason. His research, by the way, was on coronary disease and other health conditions. Why would he use the MBTI tool for this? There is plenty of research on the MBTI tool. I suggest visiting www.capt.org/MILO. The “MILO” in this web address stands for Mary and Isabel Library Online. Mary is Dr. Mary McCaulley, who was a clinical psychologist at the University of Florida. She and Isabel founded CAPT as an MBTI research laboratory. You will find numerous published works there. You can also reach out to CPP’s Research Department at research@cpp.com for further research inquiries. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Some Clinical Psychology Criticism

Nov 29, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick Kerwin then addressed a criticism about the MBTI® assessment he’s heard that “clinical psychologists don’t believe in the MBTI® tool.” I didn’t get training on the MBTI tool in my clinical program. Clinical psychologists are typically trained to administer “tests” that address psychological problems. As Patrick stated, the argument that clinicians don’t use the MBTI tool is like saying “it’s hard to find an engineer who uses a plunger.” The MBTI tool is not a test, and it doesn’t identify right or wrong about an individual. Instead, it is meant (using Isabel Briggs Myers’ words) to help us make “clearer perceptions and sounder judgments.” Unlike tests that many clinicians use and the tests I was trained on in graduate school, with the MBTI tool there are no better or worse personality types. When it comes to the MBTI tool, all of us bring something to every situation we are in and all of us have potential blind spots. I’ve been trained on and think very highly of many clinical tests. However, when it comes to exploring communication, team building, leadership, innovation, influencing and so much more, I think the MBTI tool tops the list. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts?

Nov 25, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick also addressed the idea many have that “People are really ambiverts.” He reminded us to keep in mind that just because we use both hands to type doesn’t mean we are ambidextrous. This reminded me that when I was younger and played volleyball, I used to brag a little that I could spike with both my right and left hands. In my mind I was as lethal with either a left- or right-side attack. However, when I really thought about it and when my teammates were truthful with me, I realized I was really more comfortable using my right side. Sure, we each can get used to using both hands, but in the end we really do have a preference. Likewise, while we all use both sides of a preference, we just prefer one side over the other. I like Patrick’s comment that “Our lives are not so easy that we can take a bath in our four-letter type every day.” Instead, we need to flex so that we use each side of the preferences pairs. Of course, we need to honor our true preferences, but flexing to the other side is what type development is all about. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics

Nov 22, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Another criticism Patrick Kerwin addressed is that “Jung even said there is no such thing as a pure Introvert.” Patrick (and I) actually agree! We all live in both the extraverted and introverted worlds. And, if you understand type dynamics, we all use a mental process in the extraverted world and a mental process in the introverted world. For example, I have preferences for INFP. I am not an Introvert. Instead, I introvert (I use this word as a verb since I don’t believe in using it as a noun) my Perceiving mental process when I’m taking in information and I extravert (also a verb) my Judging mental process when I’m making a decision. This is why it looks to others that I prefer Intuition, since it is the Perceiving mental process that I extravert. Then, when I’m ready to make a decision, I need my own space to use Feeling in the introverted world. Sound confusing? It really isn’t, and this is a much more useful way to understand the MBTI® tool once you learn it. It’s a big part of Module 4 of the MBTI® Certification Program. If you want to learn more about it, I suggest reading the Introduction to Type® Dynamics and Development booklet by Katharine D. Myers and Linda K. Kirby. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language

Nov 17, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference on addressing criticisms of the MBTI® tool, he noted that we sometimes hear, “The MBTI tool uses artificial binaries.” Patrick reminded us that while the MBTI tool sorts, we stress that all of us use both sides of a preference pair. We just prefer one or the other. That is why when we are using the MBTI tool, proper language is so crucial. Strictly speaking, we are not “Extraverts” or “Introverts.” Instead, we have a preference for Extraversion or a preference for Introversion. Proper language that moves away from labeling people as one or the other is probably the most important point I emphasize when I teach people about this tool during the MBTI® Certification Program. For example, when I ask participants not to label individuals as “Thinkers” or “Judgers,” (as opposed to having a preference for Thinking or a preference for Judging) they sometimes ask me, “Is this new?” While it is not new, some people take shortcuts in language use, which invites misunderstanding. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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