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The Cost of Conflict: ISTP

Jun 12, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: make decisions based on stored information What they need from others: respect for common sense How others may see them: independent and reserved Under stress may: be lost in their inner world Conflict generator: when logic and common sense are ignored Click here for more information on this...

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The Cost of Conflict: INTJ

Jun 10, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to be fair-minded What they need from others: decisiveness and opportunity to reflect How others may see them: calm and self-assured Under stress may: ignore or refuse to help others Conflict generator: being expected to justify their actions or choices Click here for more information on this...

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The Cost of Conflict: INFJ

Jun 5, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: personal integrity and sensitivity What they need from others: an overview of what and who is involved How others may see them: committed to relationships Under stress may: overcomplicate things Conflict generator: being asked to take in too much detailed information Click here for more information on this...

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The Cost of Conflict: ISFJ

Jun 3, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to learn from their mistakes What they need from others: respect for each person How others may see them: taking care of others Under stress may: get upset when others ignore the rules Conflict generator: disruption of routine Click here for more information on this...

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The Cost of Conflict: ISTJ

May 29, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to be fair-minded What they need from others: opportunities to reflect on what is happening How others may see them: good objective listeners Under stress may: become unable to prioritize Conflict generator: lack of follow-through on decisions Click here for more information on this...

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The Cost of Conflict: FP Conflict Pair

May 27, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 1 comment

Being aware of our preferences and the preferences of others can play a huge role in how we handle conflict. Individuals who prefer Feeling and Perceiving (FPs) tend to try to stay open to all sides of the story. Understanding our conflict pair preferences can also help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations. Those who prefer Feeling and Perceiving may extend the conflict indefinitely in search of a win-win outcome that might not be realistic every time…or even most of the time. For more, check out the Introduction to Type® and Conflict...

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This Is Not a Test… (Personality or Otherwise)

May 23, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 3 comments

It’s very common—especially on the Internet—to hear the MBTI® assessment referred to as the Myers-Briggs® personality test, the MBTI test, or simply the “personality test.” However, here at CPP, Inc., we never refer to the MBTI assessment that way. Personality tests may exist, but the MBTI assessment is not one of them. Here’s why… By definition, a test is “a series of questions, problems, or physical responses designed to determine knowledge, intelligence, or ability,” implying that there are “right” and “wrong” answers. It’s true that the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® assessment contains a series of questions, but that’s where the similarities to a personality test end. Unlike personality tests, the MBTI assessment doesn’t determine knowledge, intelligence, or ability. Instead, it measures four pairs of opposing preferences, which are inborn and value-neutral, to form a person’s four-letter type. No type is better or worse than any other—they are just different. That is one of the reasons that the MBTI assessment shouldn’t be used as a screening tool in hiring situations, and why any type can excel at any career. In our MBTI® Certification Programs, we do use some other terms to describe the Myers-Briggs assessment, such as tool or instrument. Those terms—generally defined as “something used in the performance of an operation”—fit the MBTI assessment perfectly. The self-awareness you can gain by using the MBTI tool to determine the significance or extent of your preferences, and the information about that you can then apply to the world around you, is incredibly useful. Besides, if you fail a personality test (which the MBTI assessment is not!), does that mean you have “no personality”?                       Credit:...

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Add Some Personality to Your Summer Reading List!

May 22, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

How many people do you interact with in a day? A month? A year? When we stop and look at the sheer volume of our interactions, it’s easy to see why learning how to improve relationships and deal with conflict is essential—not only for our success, but also for our sanity! Relationships & Conflict, the first ebook from CPP, Inc. dives deep into the essentials of relationships and conflict. This ebook will give you a better understanding of yourself and how you can interact with others more effectively. In addition, all of this information can be applied to better understand dynamics between employees in the workplace. Don’t hesitate—visit cpp.com/4U to download your copy...

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The Cost of Conflict: FJ Conflict Pair

May 20, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Being aware of our preferences and the preferences of others can play a huge role in how we handle conflict. Individuals who prefer Feeling and Judging (FJs) tend to focus on the well-being of everyone involved. Understanding our conflict pair preferences can also help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations. Those who prefer Feeling and Judging may decide on people issues too soon and might try to cut off the conflict before it really is even addressed. For more, check out the Introduction to Type® and Conflict...

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The Cost of Conflict: TP Conflict Pair

May 15, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Being aware of our preferences and the preferences of others can play a huge role in how we handle conflict. Individuals who prefer Thinking and Perceiving (TPs) tend to support the underdog and challenge the status quo. Understanding our conflict pair preferences can also help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations. Those who prefer Thinking and Perceiving may have difficulty getting to closure because they haven’t considered the impact the conflict may have on others, and so the conflict is revisited over and over. For more, check out the Introduction to Type® and Conflict...

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