Pages Navigation Menu
Categories Navigation Menu

Responding to Type Criticism—Should the MBTI® Tool Be Used for Employee Selection?

Aug 19, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

Again, no way! When people think this instrument should be used for selection, they are completely misunderstanding its premise. Remember, anyone can do anything. Sure, we have data showing which types tend to be attracted to which careers, but that doesn’t mean they will do better in a given career than other types. I always encourage people to follow their dreams, even if they don’t see a lot of people like themselves in their occupation of choice. Sometimes when people feel like they are different from others in the group, they feel like they don’t belong. Hopefully, they can also realize that they each make a unique and valuable contribution. And a different perspective often brings new potential to an organization. If you can truly see yourself contributing…then you can. Still, people will ask me why the MBTI tool should not be used for selection, so I tell them: The MBTI tool is just about our preferences; it does not tell us how well we do anything. Tools that might help us do that are trait-based tools. Traits are defined as enduring behaviorial habits, and when we measure them we try to see how much of a particular trait a person has compared to other people. Describing the MBTI® tool as a measure of a person’s traits is completely wrong. If someone tries to apply it that way, it will not work for them. Again, part of the MBTI tool is about helping us understand our S-N and T-F preferences for how we take in information and how we make decisions. That’s it. When we understand that, the instrument can be an invaluable part of life-long learning and development for the individual and a real asset for the team. If you enjoyed this post, also check out a recent blog post by Jeff Hayes, President and CEO of CPP, Inc., which includes a response to a recent criticism about the MBTI...

Read More

Add the Latest and Greatest to Your Practitioner Toolkit

Aug 14, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Are you looking to add some fun to your next MBTI® group trainings? Spice things up a bit with CPP’s new “type heads” posters. These oversized posters (32” x 48”) colorfully and creatively illustrate the Myers-Briggs® type table, with enough space for all group members to display their 4-letter personality type. They’re also large enough to display during a training, and their dry-erase finish makes them both reusable and wear-proof—a perfect combination for busy practitioners. MBTI® Type Head Posters Features the popular “Type Heads” and includes multiple descriptors of each type. MBTI® Stress Head Posters Includes the popular MBTI “Stress Heads” and identifies the stress triggers for each type, helping your clients steer clear of the “grip.” So what are you waiting for? Grab these practitioner resources...

Read More

See What’s Fact & Fiction in a New MBTI® Infographic

Aug 12, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

There’s no doubt that much of the criticism of the MBTI instrument stems from misconceptions about what it does, and what it should be used for. This is why CPP created an infographic series to address these misconceptions and clarify understanding of the instrument’s history, theory, proper use and research-based foundation. I recently had a chance to check out the second infographic in this series, which was just released a few days ago! It looks pretty cool and creatively dispels popular myths, such as the idea that the MBTI tool detects personality flaws, determines political leanings, or is available in free formats. Check out the Folk Tales & True Stories II infographic now! To view the first Folk Tales & True Stories infographic, click here....

Read More

Responding to Type Criticism—Does a True Extravert or Introvert Even Exist?

Aug 7, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Short answer: absolutely and most definitely not. The MBTI® tool is about preferences, not about labeling people as one thing or another. Actually, I like to think of the Type Table and all the preferences within as a big 16-room house. I prefer the INFP room, but that doesn’t mean I don’t need to use all of the other rooms (and all of the other preferences). Otherwise, I would start to look a bit like a caricature of my personality. I train groups as small as eight to a few hundred a day on the effectiveness of the Myers-Briggs® tool in the areas of communication, change management, conflict, diversity, and leadership. I often ask participants to guess whether I have a preference for Extraversion or for Introversion. Most people usually guess Extraversion. When I ask them why, the most common reply is “You seem comfortable talking in front of people” or “You wouldn’t be doing what you do if you were an Introvert.” That’s when I get to remind people that (1) there really is no such thing as an Extravert or Introvert, because we all draw on (and need to draw on) both Extraversion and Introversion; and (2) any type can do anything. In fact, I love the work I do as a trainer not because of my preference for Extraversion or Introversion. Instead, I love what I do because of my preferences for INFP, which in many ways is about making a difference in people’s lives. If you enjoyed this post, also check out a recent blog post by Jeff Hayes, President and CEO of CPP, Inc., which includes a response to a recent criticism about the MBTI...

Read More

Responding to Type Criticism—Is the MBTI® Tool a Test?

Aug 5, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

I recently came across an article criticizing the MBTI® tool using the word test to describe it. Whenever anyone uses that word to describe the Myers-Briggs® assessment, right away I question that person’s understanding of what this tool really does. Test implies that the answers to the questions are either right or wrong, good or bad. But that’s not the case with the MBTI tool. Instead, it is about understanding how we each take in information and how we make decisions, recognizing, for example, that while we may have a preference for Thinking, we each use Feeling—the opposite preference—every day. We must be able to use each side to be effective and productive in our work and in our life. Once people start to attach good or bad to the results of this tool, they lose the value of what it is meant to do. We must understand that we all can contribute something to every situation and we all have potential blind spots. Appreciating this about the MBTI tool can open doors to all kinds of possibilities. If you enjoyed this post, also check out a recent blog post by Jeff Hayes, President and CEO of CPP, Inc., which includes a response to a recent...

Read More

The Cost of Conflict: ENTJ

Jul 31, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to act decisively. What they need from others: honest and frank communication. How others may see them: focused on the issue and not the personalities. Under stress may: become arrogant and demanding. Conflict generators: feeling powerless to influence a situation. Did you know that understanding our conflict pair preferences can help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations? Click here to learn more about the TJ conflict...

Read More

The Cost of Conflict: ENFJ

Jul 29, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tend to show warmth and interest in the welfare of others What they need from others: a positive frame of mind and a belief that things will improve How others may see them: eager to accommodate the needs of others Under stress may: insist that everything is going well and patronize others Conflict generator: harsh criticism, unwillingness to try to improve the situation Did you know that understanding our conflict pair preferences can help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations? Click here to learn more about the FJ conflict...

Read More

Responding to Type Criticism

Jul 24, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Whenever I read criticism about the MBTI® tool it seems to relate to a misunderstanding of what this instrument is really about. I really wish people would take the time to try to understand why the Myers-Briggs® tool is so meaningful to so many people around the world. There must be something to it. I see that “something” every time I have used it over the past 26 years. With that being said, I’ve decided to write about my thoughts on personality type criticism in my next series. Stay tuned. Also, check out this blog post by Jeff Hayes, President and CEO of CPP, Inc., which includes a response to a recent criticism. I think you’ll like it as much as I do....

Read More

The Cost of Conflict: ESFJ

Jul 22, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to want the best for everyone What they need from others: approval and recognition from others for their efforts How others may see them: reluctant to engage in confrontation Under stress may: take things too personally Conflict generator: unnecessary bureaucracy that stifles something they are passionate about Did you know that understanding our conflict pair preferences can help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations? Click here to learn more about the FJ conflict...

Read More

The Cost of Conflict: ESTJ

Jul 17, 2014 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

For each category below is one of the many examples presented in the Introduction to Type® and Conflict booklet. Contribution during conflict: tendency to act responsibly and practically What they need from others: willingness to deal with the conflict objectively How others may see them: able to decide and act quickly Under stress may: become demanding and pushy Conflict generator: illogical or emotional arguments Did you know that understanding our conflict pair preferences can help us understand what blind spots we might bring to conflict situations? Click here to learn more about the TJ conflict...

Read More
Page 30 of 68« First...1020...2829303132...405060...Last »
Feedback
Your message was successfully sent!



7 + 7 =