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Type Dynamics 101: Extraverted Mental Process

Jul 16, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Step 3: What is this type’s “favorite world”? We all use our favorite mental process in our favorite world. If your overall preference is for Extraversion, your favorite world is the external world. Thus, the mental process you extravert is your favorite process. For ENFJ, as we saw in step 1, Feeling is extraverted. The overall preference for ENFJ is for Extraversion, so the favorite mental process is extraverted Feeling (Fe). If, on the other hand, your overall preference is for Introversion, your favorite world is your own internal world. Thus, the mental process you introvert is your favorite process. For INFJ, as for ENFJ, Feeling is extraverted and Intuition is introverted. However, because the overall preference for INFJ is Introversion, the favorite mental process is the one that is introverted, so the favorite mental process for INFJ is introverted Intuition (Ni). And there you have a few ideas on how to find the favorite (dominant) mental process. To figure out which mental process is introverted, read my last blog...

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The Common Language of Emirati Business

Jul 14, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Article written by Dennis Diligent, Senior VP, Global Sales, CPP, Inc. This post was originally published in Training Magazine. To read the article in its original format, click here.  Cultural exchanges can be as complex as verbal ones, and when cultures come together in business, it’s necessary to find a common language for relating to one another on an interpersonal level, in addition to communicating ideas. Having a common language in which to share ideas and collaborate is essential in international business (or any business or interaction at all), but linguistics are only the starting place for communication. Cultural exchanges can be as complex as verbal ones, and when cultures come together in business, it’s necessary to find a common language for relating to one another on an interpersonal level, in addition to communicating ideas. I have spent much of my career working with tools that help people better learn from, understand, and collaborate with one another. The use of many of these tools is expanding throughout the world alongside international business. In the past, they have been used mostly in Western countries, or at least in companies where there are only one or two prominent cultures represented. With the expansion of international business and the influence of these instruments, this regional focus is changing in a big way, and I recently had the opportunity to see the particular cross-cultural value of offering a common language for understanding and describing ourselves. The Perfect Illustration Last December, I attended the First Annual Myers-Briggs® Users’ Conference in Dubai. For me, the real benefit of hosting such an event in the UAE was being able to witness how principles of personality type, when understood by an amazingly culturally diverse audience, translated into understanding between individuals with very diverse backgrounds. The vast majority of the UAE’s population is not Emirati; it’s made up of expatriates from India, China, Europe, North America, and all over the world. I have no doubt that this kind of diversity poses special challenges for development (although challenges like these are not entirely unfamiliar to U.S. businesses either). We know the problem: When figuring out how to interact with one another, people often take mental shortcuts to develop understanding of a stranger. While someone’s cultural background, age, gender, and so on may indicate something significant about their beliefs and preferences for work style and interaction, when we get to know...

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Type Dynamics 101: Introverted Mental Process

Jul 9, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Step 2: Which mental process is introverted? As we know, everyone prefers one preference of each pair over the other, but we all use both of them at one time or another. We use both Extraversion and Introversion every day. If one of your mental processes is extraverted, then, for balance, the other one will primarily be introverted. Again, when we refer to the mental processes, we are talking about the middle two letters (S or N, or T or F) of a four-letter type. For example, people with preferences for ENFJ, who extravert Feeling, introvert—that is, express internally— their other mental process, Intuition. Those with preferences for INFJ, who have the same middle letters as ENFJs, also extravert Feeling and introvert Intuition. However, there is one more important difference between these two types that we need to look at before we can “crack the code.” To be continued… To learn more about type dynamics and extraverted mental processes, read my last blog...

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Type Dynamics 101: Extraverted Mental Process

Jul 7, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Step 1: Which mental process is extraverted? The last letter of a type (J or P) tells us which of our mental processes (one of the middle two letters) we use in the external world, or extravert. For example, let’s say you have preferences for ENFJ. The J in your four-letter type indicates that you have a preference for Judging; that indicates that you extravert your judging mental process. Remember, the two ways people come to a judgment (i.e., make a decision or come to a conclusion) are by using Thinking or Feeling. Therefore, for people with preferences for ENFJ, the process they extravert is their judging process, Feeling (F). People who have preferences for INFJ also extravert Feeling. What if the last letter of your type were P? That would indicate that you extravert your perceiving process—the process you rely on when taking in information—Sensing or Intuition. So people with preferences for ENFP, for example, extravert their perceiving process, Intuition (Ne—also known as extraverted Intuition). To be continued… For an introduction to the world of type dynamics, check out my last blog...

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When Your Client Asks ‘Why Did My Type Change?’

Jul 2, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Sometimes you’ll get clients who’ve taken a free (counterfeit) MBTI-like test online and then are surprised when the authentic MBTI® assessment you administer doesn’t match their previous results. This can be a delicate situation because you don’t want to offend or insult your client by telling them they took a fake test, but at the same time it’s important to stress that the reliability and validity of these online free version is not nearly up to par (that’s why they’re free). In addition, mindset is incredibly important when taking the MBTI assessment. If the correct mindset was not established before taking the assessment, the client is more likely to end up with a slight result or over-analyze the questions asked. This blog post by Catherine Rains discusses how to establish an effective mindset with her student clients, but the lessons can be applied just as easily to professionals and executives. We stumbled across the below podcast from an MBTI certified practitioner and loved how accurately and thoroughly she answered this question from a client. Click here to listen to the six minute podcast....

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Introduction to the World of Type Dynamics

Jun 30, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

As an introduction to the world of type dynamics, here are a few pointers on how to find a type’s favorite (dominant) process: You can find the favorite process in just three steps. If you think you need to use a calculator or multiply the temperature outside by your age or something, then you are overthinking it. Remember that when we refer to the mental processes, we are talking about the middle two letters of a four-letter type (ST, SF, NF, or NT). The other important elements to look at in determining a type’s favorite process are the first letter (E or I) and the last letter (J or P). Remember, the last letter doesn’t necessarily point to the favorite mental process. It does tell us which process a person extraverts—that is, expresses in the external world. When you put this information together, you get the eight favorite (dominant) processes: Se, Si, Ne, Ni, Te, Ti, Fe, Fi Stay tuned to get started on the three steps! To be...

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Why You Might Want to Give Procrastinators a Chance

Jun 25, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

This article was originally written for ATD, and can be seen in it’s original format here. Written by CPP’s Catherine Rains. Procrastination is probably on most managers’ “Seven Deadly Sins” lists. But don’t be too quick to assign the moniker of “procrastinator.” According to personality type theory, as described by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) instrument, certain work style and cognitive preferences, which look an awful lot like procrastination on the surface, indicate anything but laziness. The MBTI instrument categorizes personality type along four categories, including Judging/Perceiving, which describes how people make decisions. Those with preferences for Judging (J)—whose work style dominates the corporate world currently—tend to make decisions quickly, and work more efficiently and are more energized at the beginning of a project. Conversely, those who prefer Perceiving (P) tend to make decisions later, and work more efficiently and are more energized toward the end of a project. It’s easy to see how an outsider, who can’t see what’s going on “under the hood,” might easily dismiss this tendency as procrastination, which usually entails delaying something because you simply don’t want to deal with it. However, for someone with a preference for Perceiving, quite the opposite is occurring. Instead, these workers are likely taking more time to gather all the information possible in order to make the most-informed decision. While those preferring J feel unsettled waiting to commit to a course of action and like to do it early on, those preferring P feel unsettled if they close off options before they’ve fully vetted them. Both approaches are valid and offer unique benefits. But it doesn’t take much vision to understand why—in a business climate riddled with the consequences of rushed decisions—the P approach might provide balance to an “I need it yesterday” culture. Yet, this particular cognitive and behavioral orientation, while common in the population at large, is marginalized in business, education, and society—often from childhood. You’re a Slacker, and So Was Your Old Man! (No McFly Will Amount to Anything!) From early in life, those with a preference for P receive messages that negate the value of their natural approach—and praise when they make more immediate decisions. This carries on into college, where you’re expected to choose a major before you even crack open a textbook (never mind that many of tomorrow’s most critical jobs probably don’t even exist yet). In fact, you could say that...

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“Cracking the MBTI® Code,” or Type Dynamics 101

Jun 23, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Type dynamics adds another level to what the MBTI® tool is all about. In my opinion, people who haven’t yet explored this fascinating area of type knowledge are missing out on the most meaningful approach to using type. I highly recommend that you read Introduction to Type® Dynamics and Development to learn more. Discovering type dynamics will help you “crack the code” of MBTI type—that is, figure out for each type which preference is the favorite (dominant), the second favorite (auxiliary), the third favorite (tertiary), and the least favorite mental process. Stay tuned for my upcoming series on exploring the world of type dynamics… Quick “Managing Conflict” Tip for Those with Preferences for ENTJ. Your conflict style works when it’s time to stay objective and get things decided. However, it could fail if you don’t consider the impact of the conflict on those affected by it. Read more....

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Working Together: Conflict —ENTJ

Jun 18, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People who prefer ENTJ tend to quickly “reach for closure or resolution” during conflict (Introduction to Type® and Conflict, p. 39). This can work well for them when it is time to get things moving instead of letting the conflict continue to build. However, it could backfire when the need for closure doesn’t allow time to address all the real issues. The TJ conflict style from people who prefer ENTJ works when it’s time to stay objective and get things decided. However, it could fail when they don’t consider the impact of the conflict on those affected by it. Quick Tip for Those with Preferences for ENFJ. Your conflict style works when people feel like their views are being considered. However, it could fail if you get stressed to the point that you find it hard to stay logical. Read...

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Working Together: Conflict —ENFJ

Jun 16, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People who prefer ENFJ tend to “promote reconciliation” during conflict (Introduction to Type® and Conflict, p. 38). This can work well for them when the conflict is getting blown out of proportion. However, it could backfire if the conflict gets swept under the rug. The FJ conflict style from people who prefer ENFJ works when people feel like their views are being considered. However, it could fail when they don’t protect their boundaries and then get stressed to the point that they find it hard to stay logical. Quick Tip for Those with Preferences for ESFJ. Your conflict style works when people feel their side needs to be heard. However, it could fail if you don’t engage in enough critical thinking to address the real issues. Read...

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