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Mandala

Oct 27, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

The fifth day is winding down. It’s cool out and perfect for another post-dinner walk. The grounds here really are beautiful. I’m hoping Kevin and I will come back just to walk since El Retiro is only 20–30 minutes from our home. I do wonder what’s happening back home. I live in a quiet neighborhood, so probably not much, thankfully. I spent most of the day reading, praying, walking, and sleeping. Oh yeah, and eating. Another perfect day! There are only three nights and two days left. But I’m looking forward to being in another city next week to facilitate an MBTI® Certification Program. Tonight, I’m finishing up my writing to share with my spiritual director tomorrow and completing a mandala. Has anyone reading this created a mandala? From Sanskrit, mandala means “circle,” but it is far more than that. The way I’ve been taught to create a mandala is to take a meaningful word or image and draw it in a circular pattern. It helps me to concentrate on my meditation because at times, my preferences for Intuition and Perceiving can lead my mind to wander off in all kinds of directions. Although my preferences are helpful when I need to brainstorm new ideas, I need to work on becoming more grounded in everyday reality. Completing a mandala helps me do that. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: What Annoys Me in Others Is What Annoys Me in Myself Peace Be with You Seek to Understand Cheers and Blessings A Guilty Indulgence Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It...

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What Annoys Me in Others Is What Annoys Me in Myself

Oct 22, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

It’s five days into the retreat. I’m up writing and praying. At my daily meeting with my spiritual director, I’m given a few things to read. It’s not a lot of reading, although the expectation is to do two hours of prayer from that reading. I’ve written and prayed a lot these past few days—I’m just struggling with my most recent reading. I have been told that the last thing I’m supposed to do is to “intellectualize” these readings, but when I don’t get an immediate emotional reaction, that’s what I do! Grrrrr! So, I went for a walk and just meditated on one line that struck me the most: “I am the vine, and you are the branches.” This line reminds me that all of us are connected in some way to each other. That person that we love and that person that annoys us is in some way connected to us. Seeing this through the lens of type dynamics, I see that I use all four of the mental functions each and every day. However, the two functions of my four-letter type are the ones I tend to rely on the most. Early on in my life, I connected most with people who shared at least one of those functions. I found that people who preferred the opposite functions to be a bit annoying and/or uninteresting. What I have learned since then is that what annoys me in others (the non-preferred side) is often what annoys me in myself. Appreciating that non-preferred side of myself has also helped me appreciate others who prefer the opposite side of me. We are all connected in some way anyway. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Peace Be with You Seek to Understand Cheers and Blessings A Guilty Indulgence Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It...

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CAPT Responds to Merve Emre’s “Uncovering the Secret History of the Myers-Briggs”

Oct 20, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Recently a writer named Merve Emre posted an article on Digg.com titled “Uncovering the Secret History of the Myers-Briggs” that makes numerous assertions about interactions she had with The Myers-Briggs Foundation and the Center for Applications of Psychological Type (CAPT), both not-for-profit organizations entrusted with continuing the work of Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers. This article is misleading, and at times downright false. The attacks on CAPT (and people who attend certification classes) are disturbing. The author of the article did approach CAPT about writing a biography of Isabel Briggs Myers. Impressed with her talent as a writer as well as her scholarly credentials, we welcomed the opportunity to explore the possibility of working with her. Our standard policy is that any scholar reviewing the archives needs to be thoroughly educated on Myers-Briggs® type in order to contextualize the information contained in these documents. Therefore, as standard procedure with all graduate students we work with, we asked her to undergo MBTI® certification. Contrary to what the article she wrote implies, all fees for this program were waived for her, and she was enrolled in a program where no travel was required. Access to the Isabel’s archives has always been limited, for three reasons: 1. Many documents contain intellectual property related to the development of the Indicator. 2. There is a significant amount of personal information in the form of assessment results that cannot be released for privacy reasons. And there are documents that contain personal information about living people that we have a responsibility to keep private. 3. Many of these historical documents are very fragile and must be handled with great care and kept in a climate controlled environment. CAPT takes its stewardship of the archives very seriously, and access to documents in the archives is based on CAPT’s ability to keep the documents physically safe and to sort and make available to the public those parts that do not compromise intellectual property or violate the privacy of living individuals. Evaluating the quite large archival resources to address these concerns is a substantial and ongoing endeavor. Access to documents may thus be restricted because CAPT has not yet determined if a document – or parts of a document – contain proprietary intellectual property or might violate the privacy of a living person. Over the course of our engagement with Emre, we shared these considerations with her,...

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Peace Be with You

Oct 20, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

It’s time for mass. This is the only time besides our time with our spiritual directors that we can speak, sing, or greet one another. My fellow retreatants probably think it’s odd that during the offering of peace I make sure to shake hands with as many people as I can before the priest calls us back. I “work” both sides of the pew, reaching out to two pews on either side if the opportunity arises. I look right into each person’s eyes and proclaim, “Peace be with you!” I’m not too loud but perhaps a bit more boisterous than most. And then, the offering of peace has past, and I have to wait another 24 hours before I get to speak to others again. People come alive during these priceless seconds as though a switch has suddenly been turned on. It makes me realize that we can’t really know who others are just by how they look and act as they walk by us. This week everyone looks so serious in this state of silence, and the eight-day retreat is serious business. A young college student thought it looked to him like a zombie apocalypse had occurred. And yet, there is so much that goes on beneath the surface of each of us, regardless of whether we are at a silent retreat or not. Type dynamics helps me understand this, in that each of us has a part of our preferences that we extravert (using that word as a verb) and a part that we introvert (also a verb), regardless of whether or not our overall preference is for Extraversion or Introversion. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Seek to Understand Cheers and Blessings A Guilty Indulgence Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It...

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Seek to Understand

Oct 15, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Well, I’m at the halfway mark, and it still seems odd to walk right by someone and not even look up and smile. So, I do on occasion (look up and smile), and occasionally someone will look up and smile back. It feels like some small victory each time that happens, probably due to the influence of my culture along with my preference for Feeling. My MBTI® Step II™ in-preference Accepting pole description explains this nicely: “Like to be kind to others. Expect others to respond with kindness to you.” Whenever I feel as though someone isn’t being kind to me, it can really take over my day. Remembering “to seek to understand as to be understood” (Francis of Assisi) can help, but it takes a conscious effort for me to do that, especially when someone is particularly unkind or downright mean. These days of honoring each other’s silence also reminds me that letting others stay in their inner space, as well as giving myself permission to do the same, is a good thing. Not needing that smile so much can also help me become less dependent on others for how I think and feel. In the end, each of us is the person most responsible for getting what we need in life. I may try to be less “smiley” from now on, so if you walk by me and I don’t look up and smile, please don’t take offense. I’m just honoring the moment I’m in. I’ll smile at you next time. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Cheers and Blessings A Guilty Indulgence Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It...

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Colbert Takes the MBTI Assessment on The Late Show

Oct 13, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Stephen Colbert (previously of The Daily Show and The Colbert Report on Comedy Central) recently took over for David Letterman as the host of The Late Show on CBS. Helping the audience and himself to answer the question “who is Stephen Colbert” (aside from the comical conservative persona he assumed on his previous shows), Colbert “has been on a quest of self-discovery.” Taking multiple personality tests such as the MMPI, Colbert found “the most definitive personality test of them all is the Myers-Briggs.” In true Colbert fashion, his segment mixes journalistic discovery with comedy, sarcasm and a few vulgarities, contributing to an entertaining take on his self-discover process with MBTI Master Practitioner Julie Gross. Missed the show? Check out the clip: http://bit.ly/colberttakesmbti                ...

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How the MBTI Can Help You Build a Stronger Company

Oct 8, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

This article was originally posted on Forbes Magazine’s website. To read the article on the original website, click here.  Written by Elena Bajic.  Business owners know their organization’s biggest line item expense—and most valuable asset—is its people. Even if you have a sophisticated system in place for recruitment and hiring, making sure your team (or teams) are aligned and that you’ve got the right people in the right positions is critically important for growing your business. This is where the MBTI comes in. MBTI is the Myers-Briggs type indicator; the most widely used personality inventory in the world, with more than 3.5 million assessments administered each year. Personality, for the purpose of the test, includes the behavior, traits and character of an individual based on the theories developed by the psychologist Carl Jung. One of the principles of Jung’s model, “Psychological Types,” is that each of us has an innate urge to grow and part of our growth comes from understanding, individually, how we operate in the world. About 80% of Fortune 100 companies rely on these types of tests to build stronger, more effective teams and healthier organizations. How the MBTI can help you build a stronger company Tweet this blog post!   Information from personality tests help companies better understand their employees’ strengths, weaknesses and the way they perceive and process information. There are 16 Myers Briggs personality types and once that is determined, an employee usually has a better understanding of the best way to approach work, manage their time, problem solve, make decisions and deal with stress. Here’s how businesses can use MBTI data to build stronger more successful organizations: Assembling teams: MBTI results tell you a lot about how each member of your team likes to work and with whom they will collaborate most effectively and efficiently. Managers putting together a team can use MBTI information to make sure personality types don’t clash, and strengths and weaknesses complement one another. Facilitating communication: Anyone who has ever been a project manager knows that their biggest challenges aren’t necessarily technical or budgetary but personalities. If your team members know their own personality type, and that of the other team members, they will understand the best ways to communicate with one another.  And as a manager, you will have an easier time communicating with team members because you will understand how each person works best and what they need to do their job...

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Cheers and Blessings

Oct 6, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I’m sitting on a bench in the main courtyard. The sun is out, and a nice breeze is flowing through. It’s quiet but for the sound of the birds and the leaves on the trees. No one else is in sight. I picked this spot because in 1950 Kevin’s father, Garry, stood just across from me taking a group picture. Garry was a senior at St. Ignatius High School and a retreatant along with his classmates at El Retiro. Yesterday, I saw the picture of that group—65 years ago! It made me smile to see him—so young, back before he started his family of four children (Tom, Ann, Katie, Kevin) with Kay. I think it is wonderful that Kevin and I are back here all these years later. This place has such a spiritual power. I’ve found so much peace and serenity wherever I go, from the courtyard I’m in to the trails along the hill to the labyrinth I walk twice a day. The individuals who have been here before us, we after them, and those to come after us add to that power. Cheers and blessing to you, Garry Altamirano! Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: A Guilty Indulgence Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It...

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A Guilty Indulgence

Oct 1, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Today is the first real day when I’m off from work since my time so far here has been over a weekend. It’s Monday, and my colleagues at CPP have begun their week. Things are busy, and I know there’s lots of productive energy in the office. Usually on Monday I’m traveling to or starting a four-day MBTI® Certification Program. For the past four weeks straight that was the case. I facilitated certification programs for the food service, automotive, education, and public sectors. I was thrilled that each group was filled with amazing people eager to learn. So far today, the urge to check email and voicemail hasn’t been too strong. I’ve stayed away completely…amazing! I feel fortunate that taking this time to completely get away has been so welcomed by my boss and colleagues. Still, I have spent so much time over the years trying to be available that it feels odd to unplug all the way. I know that some of this comes from my MBTI preferences for Intuition and Feeling (NF). That need to make a difference in the lives of others can sometimes take time away from trying to make a difference in my own life. I will also admit to feeling a bit guilty indulging my preference for Introversion with these full days of silence. Despite that, I’m going to spend these days with a focus on me. There is plenty of time once the retreat is over to get back to everyone else. Once this experience has ended, I’m determined to also make sure I continue to sit back and reflect on what I need. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Individuation I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It All...

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Individuation

Sep 29, 2015 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

There’s been lots of time for reflection this week at the retreat. If you aren’t into that sort of thing, I wouldn’t recommend even a weekend of it. But I’m really enjoying it, though I will admit to having bouts of missing my flat-screen television. (Hmmm… I would like to get a little more caught up on Netflix episodes of “Arrow,” “Sense8,” or maybe watch all the “Daredevil” first season episodes again…) I realize that the urge to look outward is just my defense against really looking inward. It certainly helps that the Jesuit faith expresses belief in a merciful, loving God. Regardless of your beliefs, this sounds like a boost that you’d want on your side. Over these past few days, I’ve had time to think about what I’ve done right in my life, as well as what I’ve done wrong. This activity can stir up painful memories sometimes, but not so painful that I can’t look at them now and learn from them. With personality type we also have an opportunity to learn from our life experiences. That learning allows us to become the people we were meant to be. Carl Jung referred to this as individuation. While we are born with our preferences—and they do not change—what can change is how we learn to use our preferences as well as the opposite side of our preferences. During the first half of our life, this can be difficult. I know that as someone with INFP preferences, when I was young Sensing and Thinking seemed so foreign to me. Now that I’m in my fifties, I have a fascination for these opposites. However, that doesn’t mean I’m fully individuated. But I hope at least it is a sign that I’m moving in the right direction most of the time. If you want to read more, check out my previous blogs in this series: I Am So Much More Than the Roles I Play Hates Small Talk INFP Silence and Serenity Who Needs More Than the Day I Had Today? Walking and Hopping Worrying About Worrying Making a Difference—The NF Urge The Labyrinth A New Day Take a Deep Breath and Jump The Agony Airplane Mode Restless Sleep—Too Much Silence? I Walk in Peace to Find My Path Expectations Going Non-Stop Getting Away from It All  ...

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