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16 Types in the Workplace—ENTJ

Apr 19, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

So often I see people with preferences for ENTJ and ESTJ looking so similar and then so different. People with preferences for ENTJ have the ability to cut to the chase and a get-it-done approach to solving problems, but they tend to like to tackle those problems in a new and innovative way. Their favorite mental process, extraverted Thinking (Te), helps them get to an objectively logical conclusion. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process, introverted Intuition (Ni), which helps them put patterns together that others often don’t notice. Serving as a good workplace example by getting to the point and coming up with new ways to tackle issues are important contributions made by individuals with preferences for ENTJ. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFJ 16 Types in the Workplace— ESTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ENTP 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the...

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3 Simple, Brilliant Ways Introverts Can Conquer Public Speaking

Apr 14, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

This article was written by Damon Brown and published in Inc. Magazine. To read the article in its original format, click here.  I am an introvert, but I am also a TED Speaker. I prefer solitude, but I love connecting with other people. It’s less a contradiction and more the complex nature of introverted leaders. I can count Zuckerberg, Dorsey, and Ev as contemporaries, so it’s good company. That said, leadership often requires commanding an audience, whether it be at a sold out conference or in a cramped startup office. “We often try to be super extroverted and even feel guilty when we feel low energy after going to an event,” Myers-Briggs Lead Trainer Michael Segovia, an introversion-leaning speaker himself, told me. “The best way we can present is by honoring who we are.” Here is some of his top advice along with my own. 1. Get an agenda: As introverts, our quiet time isn’t just to gather social energy, but to get time to think before we speak (extrovert-leaning folks talk to think, while introvert-leaning folks think to talk). Learn or create the agenda for any meetings so you have time to think about the topics. By the time the event happens, you’ll have processed your thoughts and be ready to talk. For me, I keep my agenda on a simple index card, a technique I turned into a TED Talk. 2. Get to the space early: “Get up earlier to get to the venue and spend some time meditating in the space,” Segovia says. It doesn’t mean necessarily sitting down in the lotus position onstage, but just taking in the area and getting comfortable with the setup. One of the challenges we have is being overstimulated by the outside environment. By getting to know the venue or room, you have one less thing to adjust to. 3. Get to know individuals in the audience: I always, and I mean always, make time to meet people who will later be watching my talk or participating in my meeting. It is a show of social respect, but, for introverted leaders, it gives us crucial one-on-one time that helps us connect with at least one individual in a sea of faces. And if there is a moment when things feel rough onstage or at the front of the conference table, I can gain strength from the connections made...

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16 Types in the Workplace—ENFJ

Apr 12, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I think of one particular colleague I work with who has preferences for ENFJ and I’m always so appreciative of her outwardly warm and supportive approach at work. The favorite mental process of people with preferences for ENFJ, extraverted Feeling (Fe), helps them connect to the harmony and values of those involved on a team. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process, introverted Intuition (Ni), which can help them see what’s coming around the bend, as well as the bend after that. Serving as a good workplace example with their motivational and encouraging demeanor are important contributions made by individuals with preferences for ENFJ. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFJ 16 Types in the Workplace— ESTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ENTP 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the Workplace...

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Harnessing Diverse Personalities to Move Your Career Forward

Apr 7, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 1 comment

Written by Catherine Rains and originally posted in TD.org. To read the article on that website, click here.  There’s a human tendency to hire people like ourselves, and organizations have not made great strides in cultivating diversity in areas such as decision making, communication style, or problem solving. In fact, data that the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment publisher, CPP, has been collecting for decades show that people of the same personality type tend to hold similar jobs. When it comes to personality type, even culturally and ethnically diverse companies and departments are often more homogeneous than they appear. Personality-type similarities may not be as easy to spot as nationality or culture, but make no mistake; they’re powerful. Even though I’m an American, I might have more in common with someone in Russia who has the same personality type than I would with someone raised in my own community with a different personality type. From a career development perspective, this creates some challenges. It’s likely that either you’re on a team that generally thinks and approaches challenges the same as you, or you’re the odd one out. Those who become aware of this difference and learn to manage it will be able to make better and more creative decisions, and ultimately offer better contributions through their work. Personality-Type Homogeneity Is a Double-Edged Sword There are advantages and disadvantages to a lack of personality-type diversity in the workplace. For example, teams composed of similar types tend to experience less conflict and often exhibit more team spirit. But, there’s also the danger of group-think, not to mention that everyone has the same blind spots. With type-diverse teams, there’s more potential for conflict, but also for creativity. In MBTI parlance, people often find they work with people who have similar middle letters of their four-letter type, which describe how we make decisions. People preferring: Sensing and Thinking (ST) focus on the bottom line and accuracy. They want to get the job done right. Sensing and Feeling (SF) focus on practical service. They want to help people in a practical, grounded, “here and now” way. Intuition and Feeling (NF) want to make a meaningful difference. They want to motivate people to grow and become the best they can be, and ask if the solution is going to make the world a better place. Intuition and Thinking (NT) want to improve the system. They...

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4 Exclusive Secrets of the Myers-Briggs Tool

Apr 5, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

By Damon Brown, Entrepreneur and author, “Our Virtual Shadow”. Originally published by INC. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator has been a standard personality measurement for decades, but it’s really come into vogue recently as Susan Cain and other thought leaders encourage us to understand the benefits of introverted leadership. In the just-announced Influence Research Project, Myers-Briggs owner CPP has “new research showing that MBTI personality type is intricately connected with the successes and failures of interpersonal influencing.” It plans to reveal details in an upcoming white paper. In anticipation of the study, MBTI Lead Trainer Michael Segovia shared some misconceptions we tend to have about the MBTI personality types. 1. Introverts and Extroverts don’t really exist “We call people introverts and extroverts, but it’s not really true. No one is purely introverted or extroverted,” Segovia says. Instead, we lean towards certain outward expressions. He says it is all depends on the context of the situation. “If you are in a learning setting, then you might become more extroverted so you can better communicate with the teacher, whereas at home you could be more quiet.” What it means to you: You’re capable of both extroversion and introversion, so don’t use test results or previous situations as an excuse not to grow. 2. We’re split down the middle “Statistically in America, we are 49 percent towards extroversion, 51 percent towards introversion. In fact, that’s a steady statistic around the world. It’s just that, in America, we have a culture mandate that extroversion is more healthy,” he says. We may be at a tipping point where Facebook, Twitter and other massively successful startups are led by introversion-leaning people. What it means to you: Be flexible in how you design your company culture.  For instance, rigidly creating open-space environments or isolating offices can alienate half of your company. 3. The tool is always changing The MBTI launched in 1943, and since then there has been a litany of changes to the tool – so it may not make sense to keep relying on the one you took in college or early in your career. “We have a full research team focusing on the validity and reliability of the report as well as on the language of the report itself.” Once a lengthy process, the MBTI can now be taken online through the CPP website. It took me about 20 minutes to complete. What it means to you: Assessments like...

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16 Types in the Workplace—ESFJ

Mar 31, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I just finished working with four people with preferences for ESFJ, and I was impressed by their helpful here-and-now approach to understanding problems. Their favorite mental process, extraverted Feeling (Fe), helps them see the impact that decisions have on others. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process, introverted Sensing (Si), which can help them store facts and data to recall when they are needed most. Serving as a good workplace example by helping team members in a practical and considerate way is an important contribution made by individuals with preferences for ESFJ. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace— ESTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ENTP 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the Workplace...

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16 Types in the Workplace— ESTJ

Mar 29, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I’ve known many people with preferences for ESTJ. Early on I learned that their ability to cut to the chase and get-it-done approach to solving problems can help keep the organizational engine running. Their favorite mental process, extraverted Thinking (Te), helps them come to a conclusion in an objective and logical way, and can also help organizations understand the importance of getting projects completed. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process, introverted Sensing (Si), which can help them store facts and data to recall when they are needed most. Serving as a good workplace example by getting to the point and following rules and regulations are important contributions made by individuals with preferences for ESTJ. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ENTP 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the...

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Common Criticisms of the MBTI are Misguided

Mar 24, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Written for Psychology Today by John A. Johnson, Ph.D. Click here to read the full article in Psychology Today: http://bit.ly/1pzXOjz  The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and its spin-offs are among the most popular personality inventories in the world. The MBTI is widely used in organizational workshops to demonstrate how people with similar or different personalities interact with each other. Hundreds of thousands of people have enjoyed discovering their personality type by completing the MBTI and similar inventories on the Web. At the same time, the MBTI has been the target of extremely harsh criticism from the community of professional personality psychologists. A friend recently asked me what I thought about a recent article by Joseph Stromberg and Estelle Caswell (link is external) that described the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as “totally meaningless.” I read the article and found that its authors cited the same complaints about the MBTI that I have heard for decades. This is what I told my friend. As I see things, to say that the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is “totally meaningless” is to exaggerate the shortcomings of the instrument and how it is used.The main complaints about the MBTI that have been lodged over the years (and are repeated in the Stromberg and Caswell article) are as follows: 1. The MBTI was developed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabell Briggs Myers, neither of whom had formal training in psychometrics or psychological assessment. Briggs earned a degree in agriculture and Myers, in political science. 2. The MBTI is based on psychoanalyst Carl Jung’s theory of types. Jung is disrespected by many academic psychologists, who consider him to be a mystic without any ideas of scientific relevance. 3. The MBTI sorts people into 16 type categories, but most personality psychologists agree that individual differences in personality are better described by continuous traits than discrete type categories. They note that distributions of scores on the MBTI scales are continuous, with most scores in the middle rather than piling up at the low and high end, as type theory might predict. 4. Critics claim that there is no research indicating scores on the MBTI predict significant life outcomes such as job performance and satisfaction. I have a response for each of these criticisms. 1. Briggs and Myers may not have had formal training in psychological assessment, but they were highly intelligent, college-educated, observant, thoughtful, and passionate about understanding personality. Research by Ashton and Goldberg (1973) demonstrated...

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16 Types in the Workplace—ENTP

Mar 22, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

The people I know with preferences for ENTP tend to provide a new and innovative approach to figuring out solutions that our work projects need. Their favorite mental process, extraverted Intuition (Ne), helps them move beyond what is real to what could be. This gift can help organizations anticipate what is coming around the corner, as long as their ideas are not shut down for lack of evidence. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process, introverted Thinking (Ti), which can help them in pointing out whatever might be wrong so it can be fixed. People with preferences for ENTP can serve as a good workplace example by exploring the possibilities that others might dismiss too soon. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ENFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ESTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFP 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTP 16 Types in the Workplace—INTJ 16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the...

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Introducing the Next Wave of Refreshed MBTI® Products!

Mar 17, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

Helping clients improve how they communicate, learn, and work is at the heart of what you do. As the Myers-Briggs® experts, it’s CPP’s job to provide you with the tools and resources you need to transform the lives of others. That’s why they’ve refreshed these four popular MBTI® products to make them more engaging and compelling than ever before. Features include a new design and improved layout, updated type language, additional graphic elements, and more. MBTI® Communication Style Report MBTI® Personal Impact Report Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type and Communication (w/NEW companion website) Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type in Organizations (w/NEW companion website) To learn more and enhance your practitioner toolkit, visit cpp.com/MBTIrefresh today! While you’re there, take some time to browse through free practitioner resources for helping clients understand the impact of stress, communicating with type in mind, and more!...

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