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One Size Does Not Fit All

Aug 12, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

There are many techniques you can use when looking for a job or internship. Certain techniques will likely be energizing for your type, but others will likely be less enjoyable, or even stressful...

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You and Your Career: Priscilla’s Career Mission Statement

Aug 12, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

Taking you along our cycles of success journey of applying the MBTI® and Strong tools in your career development and personal life is Catherine Rains, M.S., CPP’s Solutions Consultant. You can read all of the blogs of this multi-part this series here. In preparation for our next meeting, I asked Priscilla to write her career mission statement using the instructions I shared with you last week. Here is how she responded: “I started out by jotting down words that resonated and then—BOOM. The statement formed, and it was perfect. It makes me very happy Here it is: I want to inspire and motivate people to grow, in an authentic and meaningful way, in order to build community and make the world a better place.” When we met the following week, we talked about how this statement reflects her current occupation, as well as where she sees herself five years from now. Not surprisingly, her statement is an accurate description of what she does now in her current position as college admissions counselor. We talked about how to use this statement moving forward as the guiding force to make sure that any new opportunities she considers also fulfill this primary motivation. Overall, Priscilla said that although it was hard to get started writing her statement, it helped her realize that she has more clarity and focus that she originally thought. As you would expect of someone with ENFP preferences, she is considering many options, but they are actually very focused: she wants to help/counsel, motivate, and inspire others. Next time I’ll share the actual options she is considering and the game plan we mapped out for her in realizing her dream career. Follow our “Cycles of Success” journey at www.cpp.com/4u ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you’re interested in taking the MBTI assessment for yourself, you can visit www.mbtionline.com. If you’re interested in the MBTI or Strong assessments for your company, you can contact one of our Solutions Consultants (such as myself) by filling out a...

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Writing a Career Mission Statement

Aug 6, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

Let me show you this gem of an exercise and discuss ways you might use it for coaching clients and advising students.

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The Light at the End of the Tunnel

Aug 5, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

One way you can manage stress is to try to spend some time each day using the preferred parts of your personality, represented by the four letters of your MBTI® type. Read more.

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My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Perceiving/Judging

Aug 4, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

Meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. This is one of several installments written by her.  In my previous post, I discussed Thinking and Feeling preferences and how I’ve learned to decipher the differences.  In this last installment, I’d like to switch gears to Judging and Perceiving. Navigating these two preferences is a huge part of my interactions with others. Two of my best friends, Ashley and Nanda, unlike me are both strong Js. Actually, I love this, because we can accomplish so much together. They are extremely organized and very efficient—and great planners. One of them actually helped me plan my itinerary for my Europe trip! I also know that with this preference, having a timetable is important to them, so I try to give them a general sense of what to expect, if I can. I also know that it’s important to stick to schedules and plans as closely as possible. Since most of our interactions are casual, there’s a little more wiggle room for personalities to mesh, so it ends up working extremely well. These are the kinds of friends that, if I mention that something “would be nice to do sometime,” are the ones that will make it happen! This sort of thing is also expressed in the work realm. I’ve learned that some J types work better when there’s a clear structure. So, I try to always have an agenda for business meetings I facilitate and stick to it as closely as possible. It may be a little extra work for me, but it’s worth it. I’m so lucky to have a strong community of folks who are all sorts of types. I’m also lucky to have a lot of ENFPs in my life too. My mom, four of my best friends, and a large handful of my group of other friends are all ENFPs. But regardless of anyone’s type, by thinking about MBTI type I remind myself not to jump to conclusions about people. I think about which areas we might feel the same about, and about areas where we might see things differently. Then I think about how can...

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My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Thinking/Feeling

Jul 31, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 1 comment

Meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. This is one of several installments written by her. In my last post, I mentioned that I tend to have a hard time recognizing Sensing and Intuition preferences in others. Also sometimes more challenging to decipher are people’s preference for either Thinking or Feeling. I’ve learned to listen for keywords that folks might use that might indicate where they fall on the spectrum. Even though I have a preference for F, I have gained a strong appreciation for the T side, thanks to my Program Evaluation grad class. Although it’s not how I think about things, I know the importance of using numbers, data, hard facts, and critical thinking. Especially in the realm of education, where budgets are tight, it’s crucial to be able to put quantitative data behind decisions. As much as I value the Thinking side, I follow my heart. I’m a very corporal thinker—as in, I use what I’m feeling, what my body is telling me, to guide my choices. I get a lot of feel-good satisfaction from my job and the work I do. I personally connect to the stories, challenges, and successes of the students I work with. Sometimes it makes for emotionally exhausting work, but ultimately its rewards are priceless. I can think of two examples where I can see this play out in my relationships. The first example is Chris, another member of the CESDA E-Board. He’s my go-to numbers guy. His heart is in the work we do, but he also wants to see the data. This is fantastic because the feel-good work gets done and we have the data to keep the work going. The second is a conversation I had with a woman who was interested in joining the organization. She mentioned she was a Feeling type. By knowing this, I was still able to give her some of the hard facts and data about CESDA, but I focused on the work we do, how it impacts students’ lives, and the camaraderie between members. By the end of the conversation, she was excited to join. In my next post...

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My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Sensing/Intuition

Jul 18, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 1 comment

Meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. This is one of several installments written by her.  In my last post, I talked a little about Extraversion and Intuition preferences. The Sensing and Intuitive preferences are sometimes harder for me to recognize in people. Two relationships where I definitely see these tendencies play out are with my grandma and my mom. My grandma is a Sensing type. She communicates information through the senses and the details. For a while there I found myself getting frustrated with the amount of detail she would share with me in relaying a simple story. I would think to myself, I don’t need to know this—why is this important? Unfortunately, I would find myself getting bored and sometimes losing focus, instead thinking about other things. But, with an MBTI lens, I’ve come to appreciate her communication style. I remind myself that it’s important for her to share these details. I can still extract the main themes of what she’s saying and process it my own way, but how she shares these details is how she processes her own information. And I’m grateful that I still have my grandma around to be able to share any and all this information with me. From the stories of her childhood to the current goings-on in her life, I can now more patiently listen to and appreciate the details. Additionally, I think about this when I catch her up on my life. Instead of just giving her the highlights, I try to remember details she might find interesting and appreciate too. My mom, on the other hand, is an Intuitive type like me. After thinking about our relationship in MBTI terms, it completely shows in our compatible communication styles. I love how easy it is for me to talk to my mom about some quick thing, get to the point of it, and move on. When we’re telling each other stories, we’ve developed a little phrase that we use often. In addition to frequently relying on “etc.” and “blah blah blah,” we glaze over the details, touching only on the ones pertinent to the story, and...

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My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Extraversion/Introversion

Jul 17, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 2 comments

Meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. This is one of several installments written by her. The more I learn about MBTI® type, the more I use it on a daily basis. It has become one of the default lenses through which I see my life and interactions. I think about it a lot in terms of my relationship to others too. One of the things about people I now find easier to pick up on is their preference for either Extraversion or Introversion. Before I better understood these opposing preferences, it was fairly easy for me (as an Extravert) to jump to conclusions about Introverts, such as they don’t like me or they don’t seem to have much to say or add to the conversation. But now I’ve learned to give Introverts their space, and I better understand where they get their energy from—that it’s not about me. I have a handful of really close friends that are fairly strong Introverts, and I thoroughly enjoy the time we spend together. I also know that they need a significant amount of time alone, for themselves. I also have quite a few Extraverted friends. These are the ones that I can call on, even after they’ve had a long day. They’ll be okay with sharing time since they get energy from being around others. I’ve also seen this part of the MBTI assessment play out in my dating life. A guy I was talking to, a strong Introvert, preferred to text. He liked to think about what he was going to say. I, on the other hand, wanted to either talk on the phone or meet up—I wanted the face-to-face communication. It was something that I picked up on right away so I was able to both bend my communication style to accommodate him better and express my needs for more instant communication. The difference also plays out in work settings. For example, one of my colleagues is a strong Introvert; she prefers email communication. Although my preference is to either call her or chat with her, I’ve learned that we work more efficiently together if I...

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First Exploration Steps in the Career Development Journey

Jun 24, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

By Catherine Rains, M.S. In my previous post I introduced Priscilla Gardea, who is currently trying to figure out where to go in her career in order to continue to develop both personally and professionally. She has already taken both the Myers-Briggs® (MBTI®) and Strong Interest Inventory® assessments, and I have gone over her results with her. During our initial session, in which I interpreted Priscilla’s Strong Profile, we reviewed potential patterns emerging from her highest Basic Interest Scales (BISs) and Occupational Scales (OSs). On the BISs, her highest scores were on the following scales (also known as career fields or functional tasks): Culinary Arts, Counseling & Helping, and Human Resources & Training, followed by Performing Arts and Office Management. (Here’s a link to a sample Strong report .)  Since BISs reflect both vocational and avocational interests, the first step was to sort out which of these fell into each category. Beginning with Culinary Arts, I first asked her to tell me about that score and where she thought it might have come from. Since on a regular basis, how could they incorporate more of it into their life? As stated, Priscilla is very enthusiastic when talking about food/cooking, but when I asked her a third question—Is this a vocational or a personal interest?—she was very clear that this was a hobby and that she had no interest in pursuing Culinary Arts professionally. Then I started the process over again on her other top BISs, using the same line of inquiry. She revealed that Counseling & Helping reflects what she currently does for a living, and she still loves this component of her work. Human Resources & Training was also intriguing to her, but since she had never had a job in this field, she did not yet have the confidence to pursue this area.  Performing Arts certainly plays a part in her current job, and again is something she really enjoys. Next we reviewed her highest-scoring Occupational Scales, which show how she responded to the items in comparison with people of her gender who actually work in each occupation. The job titles that initially piqued her interest include Career Counselor, University Administrator, Human Resources Specialist, and Community Service Director. Rather than focus solely on the very highest-scoring occupations, however, I asked Priscilla to look at all occupations on which she scored above 40. Since she answered in a...

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The Beginning of a Career Development Journey

Jun 24, 2014 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

By Catherine Rains, M.S. As promised in my introductory blog post, I’ll be discussing how to use the MBTI® and Strong tools to support your employees (as well as yourself), through the process of enhancing, expanding, and/or changing careers. To help make this series feel more real, I’ve asked a friend and colleague of mine, Priscilla Gardea, to share with us what she discovers along the way as she follows this process. Let’s start by introducing Priscilla. Almost 30 years old, Priscilla has been happily employed as a college admissions counselor for the past five years. Although she absolutely loves what she does for a living and the positive impact she makes working with students, she said it’s very unusual to be in this type of job for longer than five years, and she is beginning the process of planning her next career move. Although she would like to advance within her current university, there are no positions in her area of expertise; so to move up within the admissions field would most likely mean a move to another university and a new city.  Priscilla is considering all her options, including the possibility of getting her PhD, which would make her eligible for a wider range of college careers. However, this could result in her having to leave her current residence, which she would prefer not to do, as she is part of an established community. So here is where we begin our journey guiding Priscilla through the career development process. The first step in working with Priscilla was to administer both the Myers-Briggs® (MBTI®) and Strong Interest Inventory® assessments so that we had a comprehensive picture of both her personality and interests in terms of how they relate to potential career choices. She verified clear preferences for ENFP, and her Strong results revealed interests in the Artistic, Social, and Enterprising Themes (in that order).  ENFPs and ASEs have a lot of overlap in terms of the types of careers they are interested in, which helped her begin to focus on the types of fields that most intrigued her. In the next post we’ll look at what career fields Priscilla identified, as indicated by the Strong Basic Interest Scales (BISs), and my advice for her about what to explore based on her results. Links to content on all MBTI types and careers, as well as Strong assessment results and...

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