Pages Navigation Menu
Categories Navigation Menu

Generational Spans in Talent – Baby Boomers, Millennials, & More

Sep 3, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

As part of the “Cycles of Success: Employee Engagement, Career Development & Talent Management” series (visit www.cpp.com/4u), we conducted several interviews with Nicole Trapasso, divisional director of HR and organizational development, at CPP, Inc. Over the next few months you’ll see blog posts from these interviews and more on topics related to talent management and the phases of the talent management life cycle. If you’d like to read more about career development from the personal or employee side, you can find the first blog post in the series here: http://www.cppblogcentral.com/cpp-connect/introduction-to-employee-engagement-career-development-and-talent-management/   One highly interesting aspect of the expanding U.S. workforce is its generational stratification. While, of course, not all individuals within a single generation are the same, the fact that each of these generations is a fairly distinct group of people who grew up in similar times with similar ideals, orientations to authority, technology, relationships, and other uniting factors should be taken into consideration. For the first time in history, we’re seeing as many as four different generations in the workforce at one time, and that number will rise to five very quickly as the Baby Boomer generation extends its stay in the workforce. A generation has been defined in the social sciences as “people within a delineated population who experience the same significant events within a given period of time” (Jane Pilcher, “Mannheim’s Sociology of Generations: An undervalued legacy,” British Journal of Sociology, 45, 3 [September 1994]: 481–495. doi:10.2307/591659; retrieved 10 October 10, 2012). Start and end dates of each of the generations are interpreted differently by those who study these issues, but in general the dates reflect the U.S. Census birth curve. Of the six generations living today and listed below, the last four are considered to be active in the U.S. workforce: Greatest Generation (aka G.I. Generation) – born between 1901 and 1924 Silent Generation (aka Mature, WWII, Lucky Few) – born between 1925 and 1942 Baby Boomers – born between 1942 and early 1960s Generation X (aka Gen X) – born between early 1960s and early 1980s Millennials (aka Gen Y) – born between early 1980s and early 2000s Generation Z – born after the Millennials (generally between mid- to late 1990s and the present day; no exact agreement on these dates) A visual breakout of the generations in the U.S. labor force from the 2013 census (http://www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cpseea13.pdf) can be seen below   While all aspects of the...

Read More

Cycles of Success | Blog Directory

Sep 3, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

BLOG DIRECTORY for “Cycles of Success: Employee Engagement, Career Development & Talent Management” series.  As we continue this journey for the next few months and continue to post the various blogs, you can check back here to find them all in one central place.   Taking you along our cycles of success journey of applying the MBTI® and Strong tools in your career development and personal life is Catherine Rains, M.S., CPP’s Solutions Consultant. Introduction to Employee Engagement, Career Development, and Talent Management The Beginning of a Career Development Journey First Steps in the Career Development Journey Writing the Career Mission Statement You and Your Career: Priscilla’s Career Mission Statement You and Your Career: Priscilla’s Next Steps You and Your Career: Answering the “Is This All There Is?” Call You and Your Career: How I Answered the “Is This All There Is?” Call You and Your Career: Where Priscilla Is Today Want to learn more about employee engagement and other parts of the talent management life cycle? Nicole Trapasso, Divisional Director of HR and Organizational Development at CPP, will share her insights into the talent management life cycle, explore current trends in HR such as generational differences, evaluate how HR leaders and managers can increase employee engagement, cover best-practices from her experiences in HR, and more. What is the Talent Management Life Cycle? Meaningfulness and Engagement in Your Workforce Today’s Workplace Trends Affecting Tomorrow’s Leaders (Part I) Generational Spans in Talent – Baby Boomers, Millennials, & More Technology and Engagement in the Workplace Managing Your Employees for Long-Term Engagement The Cost of Ignoring Employee Retention? 150% or More of an Employee’s Salary Technology and Succession Planning Lastly, meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. Along the way, she’ll learn ways to apply these practices into her personal life! Meet Priscilla Gardea and follow her self-discovery journey My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Extraversion/Introversion My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Sensing/Intuition My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Thinking/Feeling My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Perceiving/Judging Priscilla’s Journey with the Strong Assessment   Visit cpp.com/4u for more tips, infographics, and more!  ...

Read More

Today’s Workplace Trends Affecting Tomorrow’s Leaders (Part 1)

Aug 22, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

This blog is a review of the session titled “High Potential Engagement—Key Strategies for Assessing, Engaging and Developing Top Talent” from the 2014 SHRM Conference in Orlando, Florida, presented by Amy Hirsh Robinson, principal of the Interchange Group. We are managing a multigenerational workforce right now. The science of HR was developed in the 1920s and 1930s, and a lot of it doesn’t reflect the type of workforce we have now, especially when it comes to Gen Xers and Millennials. Described below are a few trends in the workforce having a profound effect on the talent pool and that should be taken into consideration when engaging leaders and those with high leadership potential. Financial insecurity. Financial growth in the U.S, was relatively slow and steady during the 1970s and 1980s, with some volatility in the 1990s. However, starting in the 2000s, the markets have been much more volatile, and people are not feeling nearly as financially secure as they did during the previous 40 years. This volatility is not likely to go away anytime soon, and companies need to hold onto leaders who know how to lead when “the sky is falling.” Rapid discontinuous change. Technological advances, especially, fall into this category. The changes they represent disrupt our way of doing things—sometimes practically overnight. Change management is so important for current and future leaders because they need to be agile and be able to build a culture of agility in the workplace. Stakeholder scrutiny. Taxpayers, government entities & watchdog groups, customers, and employees are having much more of a voice than ever before (in some cases even ousting CEOs). Some of this [ability to scrutinize the actions of leaders and their companies can be attributed to the rapid advances in technology in changing communication—social media networks, the 24-hour news cycle, and so many other tech disruptions. Regardless of where it comes from, the scrutiny is real and leaders now and in the future must be aware of everything that reflects on their image and what goes out to the public. Polarization of the crowds. Continuing on the trend of technology affecting communication, the rapid transmission of data on almost any subject in the U.S. has caused common people to become more polarized on many subjects (e.g., gun control, immigration, etc.) they may not have held strong opinions on previously. Individual stakeholders of any given company will end up on...

Read More

You and Your Career: Using the MBTI® and Strong Tools for Career Planning

Aug 19, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

During our first meeting, I gave Priscilla an assignment to look for patterns among her highest scores for Basic Interest Scales and Occupational Scales on the Strong Interest Inventory® assessment. Again, what most interested her fit into focused categories: College Admissions, Higher Ed Administration, Human Resources, Motivational Speaking, and Career Counseling. She was also excited to realize how much she enjoyed writing inspiring speeches, either for herself or for others to deliver—something she could possibly do within each of the career fields she is considering, as well as within her current career in college admissions. After discussing these options, she realized that all of them would meet her primary motivation identified in her career mission statement. Although still presenting a wide range of choices, they are all focused around helping, counseling, motivating, and inspiring others. Priscilla also compiled a list of what she liked and disliked in current and past jobs. This list is being added to her career mission statement as additional criteria to consider as she continues to explore the fields that most interest her. We also discussed how, when describing the process of discovering their ideal career, individuals who share her preferences for ENFP often use some version of the phrase “it just happened.” Many NPs also often say they are still looking for “it,” even when they are currently in a career that is deeply rewarding. However, for a job/career to “just happen,” Priscilla needs to first put herself in a place where those options can find her. Since she wants to remain in the community in which she now lives, we talked about strategies for becoming more connected in her target career fields, which will allow her to explore without actually applying for any jobs, at least at this stage. More than likely, in the process of becoming connected she’ll stumble upon an opportunity that fits most or all of her search criteria, which could also include remaining with her current employer. As of today, these are the four options she is exploring, in order of priority: Moving up within her current profession as an admissions counselor at Adams State University Becoming more professionally connected in the Fort Collins community by joining the local Chamber of Commerce and other organizations (including nonprofits) that would give her exposure to professionals in her target careers Conducting informational interviews over coffee or lunch with people in her...

Read More

You and Your Career: Priscilla’s Career Mission Statement

Aug 12, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

By Catherine Rains, M.S. In preparation for our next meeting, I asked Priscilla to write her career mission statement using the instructions I shared with you last week. Here is how she responded: “I started out by jotting down words that resonated and then—BOOM. The statement formed, and it was perfect. It makes me very happy Here it is: I want to inspire and motivate people to grow, in an authentic and meaningful way, in order to build community and make the world a better place.” When we met the following week, we talked about how this statement reflects her current occupation, as well as where she sees herself five years from now. Not surprisingly, her statement is an accurate description of what she does now in her current position as college admissions counselor. We talked about how to use this statement moving forward as the guiding force to make sure that any new opportunities she considers also fulfill this primary motivation. Overall, Priscilla said that although it was hard to get started writing her statement, it helped her realize that she has more clarity and focus that she originally thought. As you would expect of someone with ENFP preferences, she is considering many options, but they are actually very focused: she wants to help/counsel, motivate, and inspire others. Next time I’ll share the actual options she is considering and the game plan we mapped out for her in realizing her dream career. Follow our “Cycles of Success” journey at www.cpp.com/4u ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you’re interested in taking the MBTI assessment for yourself, you can visit www.mbticomplete.com. If you’re interested in the MBTI or Strong assessments for your company, you can contact one of our Solutions Consultants (such as myself) by filling out a...

Read More

See What’s Fact & Fiction in a New MBTI® Infographic

Aug 12, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

By: Michael Segovia, lead trainer for CPP’s MBTI® Certification Programs There’s no doubt that much of the criticism of the MBTI instrument stems from misconceptions about what it does, and what it should be used for. This is why CPP created an infographic series to address these misconceptions and clarify understanding of the instrument’s history, theory, proper use and research-based foundation. I recently had a chance to check out the second infographic in this series, which was just released a few days ago! It looks pretty cool and creatively dispels popular myths, such as the idea that the MBTI tool detects personality flaws, determines political leanings, or is available in free formats. Check out the Folk Tales & True Stories II infographic now! To view the first Folk Tales & True Stories infographic, click here....

Read More

Are Your Surrounding Systems Separate from Your Inner Self?

Aug 12, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

Guest blog post by Ralph H. Kilmann, co-author of the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI)   In previous blogs, I’ve examined inner reflections such as who determines your self-worth (you or others?) and how you resolve the conflict between your ego and your soul. Using one or more of the five TKI conflict modes, each of us develops some answers to these questions—or we avoid the topic altogether and thus let the “answers” be driven by our conditioned habits and unconscious cultural expectations. In other blogs I’ve suggested that at least 80% of what goes on in an organization is determined by its systems, while only 20% is determined by people’s preferences, talents, and skills. By systems, I mean the cultures, strategies, reward structures, procedures, roles, and work processes that guide organizational behavior and results. With this background, I would like to address the observation that we typically define our inner self as being separate from our surrounding systems. So I ponder: What are the consequences of keeping that sense of self (some integration of ego, soul, and self-worth) separate? In sharp contrast, what would life be like if we developed a radically different solution, whereby our sense of self explicitly included all our surrounding systems? Naturally, we can avoid the whole topic and continue living on the premise that our systems are out there somewhere (outside our skin-encapsulated self). If we engage in a discussion (either as an inner dialogue or with other people), however, we can then begin a debate on whether: (1) our surrounding systems should be kept on the outside, or (2) our surrounding systems should be fully incorporated into our definition of selfhood. With this either/or perspective, of course, we are moving up and down the distributive dimension on the TKI Conflict Model. As such, we can pick one extreme view over the other (by using either the competing mode or the accommodating mode). Or we can develop a compromise solution somewhere in the middle of the distributive dimension by suggesting when it is useful to consider our systems separate from ourselves and when it is best to incorporate them (only while we are at work, for example). Any derived solution on the distributive dimension, however, will only partially satisfy the challenges of living as a separate self or an embedded self. If a particular set of situational attributes can be developed for this...

Read More

Meaningfulness and Engagement in Your Workforce

Aug 11, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

As part of the “Cycles of Success: Employee Engagement, Career Development & Talent Management” series (visit www.cpp.com/4u), we conducted several interviews with Nicole Trapasso, Divisional Director of HR and Organizational Development at CPP, Inc. Over the next few months you’ll see blog posts from these interviews and more on topics related to talent management and the phases of the talent management life cycle. If you’d like to read more about career development from the personal or employee side, you can find the first blog post in the series here: http://www.cppblogcentral.com/cpp-connect/introduction-to-employee-engagement-career-development-and-talent-management/ The majority of professionals seek meaning throughout the various stages of  their careers. At CPP, we focus on helping our employees find meaningfulness in their work while identifying and harnessing the specific talents and differences that make each employee unique. Earlier in their career, employees may be looking for initial mentorship and the ability to work on varied and challenging projects. For employees that actively engage in their own development, this continues but takes on different aspects as they grow and gain new skills and competencies or their roles gain more complexity as they progress in their career. Some individuals have goals that expand beyond their current job role in the organization and want to grow professionally. At CPP, we are fortunate to have access and use our own assessments to help our employees increase their self-awareness and grow skills. Not all organizations have this key competitive advantage. The clearer employees become about their developmental needs and growth goals, and how they can get those needs met (both inside the workplace and out), the better both the individuals and their employers can continue to keep them challenged, growing and engaged which is a key way to keep your talent committed to your organization. Ideally, the organization can help meet their employees ‘needs while concurrently meeting its own business goals and talent objectives. CPP is in a unique position: our mission and vision—based on the goal of helping people grow on a global basis—are clearly aligned with the nature of our products and services. For many employees and potential employees, this is is aligned with their personal and professional goals of finding meaning for themselves through their work and giving back to others in a very powerful way. At other organizations, the connection to meaningful work in employee’s day-to-day job might not be as obvious. However, there are a few...

Read More

Writing a Career Mission Statement

Aug 6, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

Let me show you this gem of an exercise and discuss ways you might use it for coaching clients and advising students.

Read More

My Personal Outlook on MBTI® Type & Relationships: Perceiving/Judging

Aug 4, 2014 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

Meet Priscilla Gardea as she goes along her own journey of self-discovery and assessment! As an avid MBTI user (and lover), she will be exploring how our line-up of CPP tools can help her reach her professional and career goals, while sharing insights with you on the “whats” and “hows”. This is one of several installments written by her.  In my previous post, I discussed Thinking and Feeling preferences and how I’ve learned to decipher the differences.  In this last installment, I’d like to switch gears to Judging and Perceiving. Navigating these two preferences is a huge part of my interactions with others. Two of my best friends, Ashley and Nanda, unlike me are both strong Js. Actually, I love this, because we can accomplish so much together. They are extremely organized and very efficient—and great planners. One of them actually helped me plan my itinerary for my Europe trip! I also know that with this preference, having a timetable is important to them, so I try to give them a general sense of what to expect, if I can. I also know that it’s important to stick to schedules and plans as closely as possible. Since most of our interactions are casual, there’s a little more wiggle room for personalities to mesh, so it ends up working extremely well. These are the kinds of friends that, if I mention that something “would be nice to do sometime,” are the ones that will make it happen! This sort of thing is also expressed in the work realm. I’ve learned that some J types work better when there’s a clear structure. So, I try to always have an agenda for business meetings I facilitate and stick to it as closely as possible. It may be a little extra work for me, but it’s worth it. I’m so lucky to have a strong community of folks who are all sorts of types. I’m also lucky to have a lot of ENFPs in my life too. My mom, four of my best friends, and a large handful of my group of other friends are all ENFPs. But regardless of anyone’s type, by thinking about MBTI type I remind myself not to jump to conclusions about people. I think about which areas we might feel the same about, and about areas where we might see things differently. Then I think about how can...

Read More
Page 7 of 29« First...56789...20...Last »
Feedback
Your message was successfully sent!



10 + 10 =