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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Is Reliable

Dec 8, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick addressed that the criticism that the MBTI tool isn’t reliable all tracks back to one article published in 1993, before the current form was even published. Data show that test-retest reliability for the MBTI tool is actually very good. When people get a different result on the assessment from one time to the next, it is usually because they reported “slight” the first time. With a result of “slight,” you could have answered just a few questions differently and reported toward the opposite preference. However, looking at that psychometrically, usually that’s just a few points difference, which is actually very good reliability. One critic of the assessment claimed that he took it one time and reported INTJ, and then took it again and reported ESFP (the exact opposite type). Our data show that this only happens when a person is not taking the assessment seriously or is purposely trying to get opposite results. The MBTI tool is not meant to trick you. But if you know enough about the theory, you know what the questions are getting at. That is one reason why we don’t suggest taking it over and over again. If you want to delve deeper, look at something called internal consistency reliability. For the MBTI tool, these numbers are excellent with different age groups and ethnicities, and by gender. Click here to check out some interesting reliability and validity data. MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Doesn’t Just Flatter You MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / It Doesn’t Just Flatter You

Dec 6, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing my overview of Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference, Patrick noted that the criticism that the MBTI® tool just flatters people was somewhat odd. Those of us who know what the MBTI tool is really about know that it’s not a diagnostic tool. It’s not even a test. “Test” implies results of good and bad, pass or fail. The MBTI descriptions may indeed seem flattering at times. All of us bring something to every situation we are in. All of us have gifts. That may seem flattering. However, if we overuse those gifts, then things do not appear so flattering after all. For example, when I overuse my preferences for Intuition and Perceiving I can come across as a bit unfocused and even a little flighty. I like to ask people, “Are you using your preferences, or are your preferences using you?” If it’s the latter, then they may be coming across as a bit of a caricature of their preferences. I see this in people who overuse Extraversion or Introversion. Someone who overuses Extraversion may tend to overwhelm others in certain situations. Someone who overuses Introversion may tend to underwhelm situations. Neither example is very flattering. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / There is Plenty of Research

Dec 1, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing with Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference, Patrick addressed the criticism that the MBTI assessment is not in clinical psychology journals. He noted it’s not in clinical journals because it’s not a clinical tool. It doesn’t belong in clinical journals. A CPP board member didn’t use it in his published research for that very reason. His research, by the way, was on coronary disease and other health conditions. Why would he use the MBTI tool for this? There is plenty of research on the MBTI tool. I suggest visiting www.capt.org/MILO. The “MILO” in this web address stands for Mary and Isabel Library Online. Mary is Dr. Mary McCaulley, who was a clinical psychologist at the University of Florida. She and Isabel founded CAPT as an MBTI research laboratory. You will find numerous published works there. You can also reach out to CPP’s Research Department at research@cpp.com for further research inquiries. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Some Clinical Psychology Criticism

Nov 29, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick Kerwin then addressed a criticism about the MBTI® assessment he’s heard that “clinical psychologists don’t believe in the MBTI® tool.” I didn’t get training on the MBTI tool in my clinical program. Clinical psychologists are typically trained to administer “tests” that address psychological problems. As Patrick stated, the argument that clinicians don’t use the MBTI tool is like saying “it’s hard to find an engineer who uses a plunger.” The MBTI tool is not a test, and it doesn’t identify right or wrong about an individual. Instead, it is meant (using Isabel Briggs Myers’ words) to help us make “clearer perceptions and sounder judgments.” Unlike tests that many clinicians use and the tests I was trained on in graduate school, with the MBTI tool there are no better or worse personality types. When it comes to the MBTI tool, all of us bring something to every situation we are in and all of us have potential blind spots. I’ve been trained on and think very highly of many clinical tests. However, when it comes to exploring communication, team building, leadership, innovation, influencing and so much more, I think the MBTI tool tops the list. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts?

Nov 25, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick also addressed the idea many have that “People are really ambiverts.” He reminded us to keep in mind that just because we use both hands to type doesn’t mean we are ambidextrous. This reminded me that when I was younger and played volleyball, I used to brag a little that I could spike with both my right and left hands. In my mind I was as lethal with either a left- or right-side attack. However, when I really thought about it and when my teammates were truthful with me, I realized I was really more comfortable using my right side. Sure, we each can get used to using both hands, but in the end we really do have a preference. Likewise, while we all use both sides of a preference, we just prefer one side over the other. I like Patrick’s comment that “Our lives are not so easy that we can take a bath in our four-letter type every day.” Instead, we need to flex so that we use each side of the preferences pairs. Of course, we need to honor our true preferences, but flexing to the other side is what type development is all about. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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