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Showing Appreciation—ENTP

Feb 23, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In this series I’m delving into how each of the 16 types approaches being thankful. If you want to read a little about your own preferences ahead of time, feel free to visit this link: cpp.com/share. Today’s type: ENTP. You likely acknowledge other people’s competence and innovation. Remember also to celebrate special dates for them and reward their efforts. That description reflects how people with preferences for ENTP tend to show appreciation for new ideas. Changing things up to make the organization better is a big part of what drives them. As a result, their showing outward appreciation and warmth to others may not come across as much. If your preferences are ENTP, it might help to remember that happy people tend to do better work and stay longer in their job. Happy people in our personal life also tend to stay. The trick is to remember that different things make different people happy. Want to read more about the different approaches to being thankful? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Showing Appreciation—ENFP Showing Appreciation—ESFP Showing Appreciation—ESTP Showing Appreciation— INTP Showing Appreciation—INFP Showing Appreciation—ISFP Showing Appreciation—ISTP Showing Appreciation—INTJ Showing Appreciation—INFJ Showing Appreciation—ISFJ Showing Appreciation—ISTJ What I’m Thankful For…...

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Showing Appreciation—ENFP

Feb 21, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In this series I’m delving into how each of the 16 types approaches being thankful. If you want to read a little about your own preferences ahead of time, feel free to visit this link: cpp.com/share. Today’s type: ENFP. You appreciate others heartily with a flurry of attention. Some people may like more private, quiet recognition. That description reflects the enthusiastic, “cheerleader” approach often displayed by individuals who prefer ENFP. I actually love their positive, “can-do” attitude, but I have to admit that at times I can feel a bit overwhelmed by it. So if your preferences are ENFP, while thinking about getting your own needs met, also try to strike a balance in your approach in showing appreciation for those loved ones who might need a bit more space to celebrate in a more reflective manner. Want to read more about the different approaches to being thankful? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Showing Appreciation—ESFP Showing Appreciation—ESTP Showing Appreciation— INTP Showing Appreciation—INFP Showing Appreciation—ISFP Showing Appreciation—ISTP Showing Appreciation—INTJ Showing Appreciation—INFJ Showing Appreciation—ISFJ Showing Appreciation—ISTJ What I’m Thankful...

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7 Leadership Traits of Successful CIO’s

Feb 17, 2017 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

This article originally appeared in CIO Magazine. To read the article in its original format, click here.  The California Psychology Inventory (CPI), developed by CPP — the exclusive publisher of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator assessment — is an assessment tool that help leaders gain more insight into and improve their performance. Ultimately, the CPI helps identify your leadership strengths and weaknesses, what motivates you and can help you understand your personal “thinking style.” This year, the CPP released the seven key traits CIOs need in order to be successful leaders. These are the key traits most commonly associated with CIOs who have taken the assessment test. According to Sherrie Haynie, an organizational development consultant and personality expert with CPP, these traits are set to become increasingly important as cloud infrastructure pushes these leaders to become “agents of change.” Businesses will need strong CIO leadership to smoothly navigate such a transitional time in technology — and a good place to start is to find someone who has these seven leadership traits. Empathy Part of running a successful business involves understanding your employees and their day-to-day roles inside the company. But your employees are often juggling more than just their day jobs — the American Institute of Stress cites workload, people issues, work-life balance and lack of job security as four of the biggest stressors facing modern workers. And, as the American Institute of Stress points out, increased levels of job stress can lead to less engaged, productive and effective employees. “Empathy is one of the most critical competencies in the execution of leadership. CIOs who demonstrate empathy are able to get inside their employees’ and co-workers’ experiences and try to imagine what they are thinking and feeling. CIOs who display a high preference towards empathy understand that getting buy-in from the rest of their team requires others to believe in their message,” says Haynie. Building a culture of empathy starts at the top by setting a standard for everyone else to follow. An empathetic company culture will encourage workers to speak up if they’re struggling either personally or with their workload. Dominance Dominance in leadership requires a delicate balance — an overly dominant leader won’t gain many followers, while a nondominant leader may portray a lack of confidence. The best CIOs and leaders are the ones who can find a balance between dominance and empathy, says Haynie. “Dominance is a...

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Showing Appreciation—ESFP

Feb 16, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In this series I’m delving into how each of the 16 types approaches being thankful. If you want to read a little about your own preferences ahead of time, feel free to visit this link: cpp.com/share. Today’s type: ESFP. You likely enjoy finding or making practical gifts or sharing events. Remember, others may not like spontaneous celebrations. That description relates to the here-and-now, friendly approach often shown by individuals who prefer ESFP. But while their way of showing appreciation may reflect their tendency to enjoy hands-on activities in the moment, people with the opposite preferences might welcome a little more planned and subdued show of appreciation. If your preferences are ESFP and you are in a relationship with someone of the opposite type, try to mix it up a bit so you both get what you want. Want to read more about the different approaches to being thankful? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Showing Appreciation—ESTP Showing Appreciation— INTP Showing Appreciation—INFP Showing Appreciation—ISFP Showing Appreciation—ISTP Showing Appreciation—INTJ Showing Appreciation—INFJ Showing Appreciation—ISFJ Showing Appreciation—ISTJ What I’m Thankful For…...

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Showing Appreciation—ESTP

Feb 14, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In this series I’m delving into how each of the 16 types approaches being thankful. If you want to read a little about your own preferences ahead of time, feel free to visit this link: cpp.com/share. Today’s type: ESTP. You may show appreciation for others with impromptu or unexpected actions. Be sure these surprises don’t disrupt someone’s plans. That description reflects the here-and-now, playful approach often shown by individuals who prefer ESTP. Mixing fun with work is a great way for them to break things up, maintain momentum, and continue moving forward. For others (likely those who prefer FJ and TJ), however, this spontaneous approach might be seen as an impediment to their process. So if your preferences are ESTP, check with others’ schedules before you show your appreciation using your typical fun approach so you don’t disrupt their process. Want to read more about the different approaches to being thankful? Check out my previous blogs in this series: Showing Appreciation— INTP Showing Appreciation—INFP Showing Appreciation—ISFP Showing Appreciation—ISTP Showing Appreciation—INTJ Showing Appreciation—INFJ Showing Appreciation—ISFJ Showing Appreciation—ISTJ What I’m Thankful...

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