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MBTI Step II Facets: An Overview

Jun 20, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

In the next few blog entries I will give you my take on the MBTI® Step II™ facets. Those of you who have been through CPP’s MBTI Certification Program know what an interesting day exploring the facets in more detail can be. While the facets don’t cover every characteristic of each dichotomy, they are “important and significant subsets,” as one participant expressed it. We have to remember that the facet results don’t add up to the dichotomies, and therefore some clients could have more out-of-preference facets than in-preference facets on any dichotomy. While this can happen on Extraversion–Introversion, Sensing–Intuition, and Judging–Perception, it will most likely occur on Thinking–Feeling. For that reason, I will explore the Thinking–Feeling facets first. (Other than that, I’m not going to write in any particular order; instead, I’ll rely on my Emergent style—Methodical–Emergent is a Judging–Perceiving facet—and just let it flow.) As you work with individuals to help them improve essential components of their professional development, it’s important that they understand how to combine different aspects of their individual MBTI Step II facet results and learn the most appropriate ways for them to flex their preferences. And in case you’re looking for a little more reading material on the MBTI Step II facets, here are two complimentary eBooks that offer ideas and tips for using Step II results to increase your people’s self-awareness and understanding: “How to Manage Seemingly Contradictory Facet Results on the MBTI® Step II™ Assessment” “Flexing MBTI® Step II™ Facets Appropriately to Maximize Effectiveness” Lastly, we’ve mentioned this in previous blogs but we do have a few new products that have been refreshed for a more modern aesthetic and user-friendly visuals, which includes some of our MBTI Step II products. To learn more about these refreshed MBTI Step II products,...

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Interview: The Beginnings of the SuperStrong Assessment

Jun 7, 2017 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

While CPP, Inc. has been around for over sixty years and is best known for the Myers-Briggs® and Strong Interest Inventory® assessments, our small but mighty division, CPP Innovation Labs, was created to listen to our customer’s and the market’s current needs to develop products and services to address those. Challenging the status quo is what we’re all about at CPP Innovation Labs. Craig Johnson, Director of Data Science, talks to us about how the SuperStrong assessment was developed.

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Interview: The Beginnings of the SuperStrong Assessment

Jun 7, 2017 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

While CPP, Inc. has been around for over sixty years and is best known for the Myers-Briggs® and Strong Interest Inventory® assessments, our small but mighty division, CPP Innovation Labs, was created to listen to our customer’s and the market’s current needs to develop products and services to address those. Challenging the status quo is what we’re all about at CPP Innovation Labs. Craig Johnson, Director of Data Science, talks to us about how the SuperStrong assessment was developed.

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Leadership and the Intuition–Thinking (NT) Process Pair

Jun 6, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 1 comment

People with NT preferences (INTJs, INTPs, ENTPs, ENTJs) typically take a “what else can we do” approach to leadership. They tend to consider new ways to address tasks and projects, and often have an innovative mind-set that is about changing things up to make a situation better. If NT informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your open approach to new ideas and possibilities, but others may find what they see as change for the sake of change too impractical and lacking consideration of how it’s affecting others. Remember, changing things just because you are bored doing them the same way all the time can be very aggravating to people who appreciate stability and consistency. If NT informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you feel stuck in a rut and not sure what to try next. Don’t take it personally or assume your NT leader doesn’t appreciate your work just because every solution you offer is not met with rapt attention or accepted. Now that we’ve talked a bit about those two middle letters, let’s look at leaders with each of the four-letter MBTI personality types that contains that process pair: INTJ Preference Leaders We find a moderate number of leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer INTJ make up almost 6% of leaders, while representing only 2% of the general population. Their preferences may help them prepare for long-term possibilities and then organize decisions logically. During initial stress, however, they may start to imagine patterns or connections where they don’t exist. INTP Preference Leaders We find a moderate number of leaders of this type. People who prefer INTP make up almost 6% of leaders, while representing only 3% of the general population. Their preferences may help them analyze the pros and cons of a situation and then to anticipate the long-term outcomes. During initial stress they may become overly critical of others and can come across as feeling superior. ENTP Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type around the world. People who prefer ENTP make up over 8% of leaders, while representing only 3% of the general population. Their preferences may help them come up with a variety of short-term...

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Leadership and the Intuition–Feeling (NF) Process Pair

May 30, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with NF preferences (INFJs, INFPs, ENFPs, ENFJs) typically take a “let’s make a difference” approach to leadership. They consider how others can be positively affected over the long term instead of just in the present moment. In leading they tend to focus on big-picture, future-oriented ideas that can empower people to “be better.” If NF informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your support of their big-picture ideas, [OK?] but others may find your approach too pie-in-the-sky and not directive enough. Remember, some people need detailed, step-by-step instructions to know what you really want from them. If NF informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble coming up with new ways to make a difference. Try not to get impatient when your NF leader is exploring possibilities that seem unrealistic to you. Let’s take a quick look at each of these four-letter MBTI types and their leadership attributes: INFJ Preference Leaders Another one of the rarest of the leadership types, people who prefer INFJ make up only 2% of leaders around the world. Part of this could be that, at under 2% of the general population, they represent the smallest percentage of the population anyway. Again, just because we don’t find a lot of people who prefer INFJ in leadership positions does not mean they cannot make outstanding leaders. Their preferences may help them recognize long-term, big-picture possibilities as well as how their decisions affect others. During initial stress they may start to think everyone is against them and then withdraw emotionally. INFP Preference Leaders Not one of the more common leadership types, people who prefer INFP make up about 3% of leaders around the world. Their preferences may help them hold themselves and their organization to their values as well as consider many approaches to learning new things. During initial stress they may start to feel sorry for themselves as well as get a bit “preachy.” My own preferences are for INFP, and I like leadership opportunities where I can inspire others. I can get discouraged when people get overly critical and get bogged down in details. ENFP Preference Leaders People who prefer ENFP make up almost 7% of leaders. Interestingly, the workshop I delivered this month with 41 CEOs...

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