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16 Types in the Workplace—INFJ

Feb 11, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

One of my very best friends has preferences for INFJ. I have to admit that I don’t personally know many other people with these preferences, and not surprisingly, INFJ is the rarest, or among the rarest type, depending on which data you are looking at. An innovative approach to understanding ideas along with a quiet, considerate, and behind-the-scenes follow-through are workplace contributions often associated with people of this type. Their favorite mental process (Ni) helps them see not only around the next corner but also several corners after that. This sometimes means that they might seem a bit “out there,” but if an organization can learn to appreciate that different approach, they get in return someone who can come up with innovative ways to make a difference in the lives of their colleagues and even the organization’s customers. Like their ISFJ “cousins,” those with preferences for INFJ back up their favorite mental process using extraverted Feeling. This harmonious and values-based approach to making decisions helps them be recognized as team players who are in tuned with their colleagues’ needs. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the Workplace...

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16 Types in the Workplace—ISFJ

Feb 9, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Colleagues and other people I know (including my partner, Kevin) with preferences for ISFJ often provide the friendly and practical follow-through that people in the workplace need. Like their “cousins,” ISTJ, their favorite mental process (Si) helps them remember important details from the past, and this gift can help prevent an organization from repeating mistakes as long as we make sure to include them. However, they need to be encouraged to speak up; we can help by patiently listening and not interrupting their step-by-step approach. Their favorite mental process is backed up by their second process (Fe), which can help them make decisions in a harmonious and values-based way. Being loyal to the organization and the people in it is an important contribution those with preferences for ISFJ make. Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: 16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ 16 Types in the...

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16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ

Feb 4, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 2 comments

The people I know with preferences for ISTJ often provide the direct and to-the-point follow-through that work projects need. Their favorite mental process (Si) helps them remember important details from the past, and this gift can help prevent an organization from repeating mistakes as long as these individuals are encouraged to share their historical approach to understanding facts. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process (Te), which can help them organize decisions in a logical and efficient way. Serving as a good workplace example by taking responsibility for their work and expecting others to do the same is an important contribution that those with preferences for ISTJ...

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Looking at the Strong Scales as Puzzle Pieces

Feb 4, 2016 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

When we have a client with unique results on the Strong Interest Inventory® assessment, we practitioners can find ourselves doing a double take … or at least some serious head scratching.

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16 Types in the Workplace

Feb 2, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I’ve started off 2016 with a lot on my plate. I earned my Foundations of Dialogue Education Certification while also facilitating several MBTI® and FIRO® workshops. It has been a fun and busy way to get the year going, and I don’t see it letting up. That’s a good thing! In a recent training I was asked by a participant, “Which four preferences contribute most to an organization?” Interesting question I thought, before answering, “Any preference can contribute to an organization, and any preference can present challenges.” The question, “What do each of the 16 four-letter types bring to the workplace?” has led me to my next series on type. Stay tuned… If you are looking for an exclusive thought leadership event to further your MBTI training, check out our upcoming 2016 MBTI® Users Conference. Registration is now open. I’ve already heard from a few of you who have signed up. I look forward to seeing you then! Want to read more about my experience at the 2015 MBTI® Users Conference? Check out my last blog series: Is It Over Already? I’m Next! Part 2 I’m Next! MBTI® Tool and Influencing—The Power of the Mental Processes Connecting with Food and Drink MBTI® Criticism Type and Influence Ford Motor Company and the MBTI® Framework Global MBTI® Panel What Lunch? There’s More? Up Next I’m Impressed The Late Show with Stephen Colbert So It Begins 2015 MBTI® Users Conference...

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