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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Where’s the Research?

Dec 1, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing with Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference, Patrick addressed the criticism that the MBTI assessment is not in clinical psychology journals. Well, it’s not in other journals because it’s not a clinical tool. It doesn’t belong in clinical journals. A CPP board member didn’t use it in his published research for that very reason. His research, by the way, was on coronary disease and other health conditions. Why would he use the MBTI tool for this? There is plenty of research on the MBTI tool. I suggest visiting www.capt.org/MILO. The “MILO” in this web address stands for Mary and Isabel Library Online. Mary is Dr. Mary McCaulley, who was a clinical psychologist at the University of Florida. She and Isabel founded CAPT as an MBTI research laboratory. You will find numerous published works there. You can also reach out to CPP’s Research Department at research@cpp.com for further research inquiries. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Clinical Psychology Criticism

Nov 29, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick Kerwin then shared a criticism about the MBTI® assessment he’s heard that “clinical psychologists don’t believe in the MBTI® tool.” I didn’t get training on the MBTI tool in my clinical program. Clinical psychologists are typically trained to administer “tests” that address psychological problems. As Patrick stated, the argument that clinicians don’t use the MBTI tool is like saying “it’s hard to find an engineer who uses a plunger.” The MBTI tool is not a test, and it doesn’t identify right or wrong about an individual. Instead, it is meant (using Isabel Briggs Myers’ words) to help us make “clearer perceptions and sounder judgments.” Unlike tests that many clinicians use and the tests I was trained on in graduate school, with the MBTI tool there are no better or worse personality types. When it comes to the MBTI tool, all of us bring something to every situation we are in and all of us have potential blind spots. I’ve been trained on and think very highly of many clinical tests. However, when it comes to exploring communication, team building, leadership, innovation, influencing and so much more, I think the MBTI tool tops the list. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts? MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Ambiverts?

Nov 25, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Patrick also brought up the idea many have that “People are really ambiverts.” But keep in mind that just because we use both hands to type doesn’t mean we are ambidextrous. When I was younger and played volleyball, I used to brag a little that I could spike with both my right and left hands. In my mind I was as lethal with either a left- or right-side attack. However, when I really thought about it and when my teammates were truthful with me, I realized I was really more comfortable using my right side. Sure, we each can get used to using both hands, but in the end we really do have a preference. Likewise, while we all use both sides of a preference, we just prefer one side over the other. I like Patrick’s comment that “Our lives are not so easy that we can take a bath in our four-letter type every day.” Instead, we need to flex so that we use each side of the preferences pairs. Of course, we need to honor our true preferences, but flexing to the other side is what type development is all about. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Type Dynamics

Nov 22, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Another criticism Patrick Kerwin shared with us is that “Jung even said there is no such thing as a pure Introvert.” We actually agree! We all live in both the extraverted and introverted worlds. And, if you understand type dynamics, we all use a mental process in the extraverted world and a mental process in the introverted world. For example, I have preferences for INFP. I am not an Introvert. Instead, I introvert (I use this word as a verb since I don’t believe in using it as a noun) my Perceiving mental process when I’m taking in information and I extravert (also a verb) my Judging mental process when I’m making a decision. This is why it looks to others that I prefer Intuition, since it is the Perceiving mental process that I extravert. Then, when I’m ready to make a decision, I need my own space to use Feeling in the introverted world. Sound confusing? It really isn’t, and this is a much more useful way to understand the MBTI® tool once you learn it. It’s a big part of Module 4 of the MBTI® Certification Program. If you want to learn more about it, I suggest reading the Introduction to Type® Dynamics and Development booklet by Katharine D. Myers and Linda K. Kirby. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity / Proper Type Language

Nov 17, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

Continuing Patrick Kerwin’s session at the MBTI® Users Conference on addressing criticisms of the MBTI® tool, he related that we sometimes hear, “The MBTI tool uses artificial binaries.” Sure, the MBTI tool sorts, but we stress that all of us use both sides of a preference pair. We just prefer one or the other. That is why when we are using the MBTI tool, proper language is so crucial. Strictly speaking, we are not “Extraverts” or “Introverts.” Instead, we have a preference for Extraversion or a preference for Introversion. Proper language that moves away from labeling people as one or the other is probably the most important point I emphasize when I teach people about this tool during the MBTI® Certification Program. For example, when I ask participants not to label individuals as “Thinkers” or “Judgers,” (as opposed to having a preference for Thinking or a preference for Judging) they sometimes ask me, “Is this new?” While it is not new, some people take shortcuts in language use, which invites misunderstanding. Want to read more about the Users Conference? Check out my previous blogs in this series: MBTI® Users Conference—Creating a Culture of Clarity MBTI® Users Conference—Communication Breakthroughs: The Genesis for Better Understanding of Others MBTI® Users Conference—From Diversity to Inclusion to Engagement MBTI® Users Conference—The Art of Culture Hacking MBTI® Users Conference—A Step II™ Day MBTI® Users Conference—Culture...

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