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16 Types in the Workplace—ISTJ

Feb 4, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

The people I know with preferences for ISTJ often provide the direct and to-the-point follow-through that work projects need. Their favorite mental process (Si) helps them remember important details from the past, and this gift can help prevent an organization from repeating mistakes as long as these individuals are encouraged to share their historical approach to understanding facts. This favorite process is backed up by their second favorite process (Te), which can help them organize decisions in a logical and efficient way. Serving as a good workplace example by taking responsibility for their work and expecting others to do the same is an important contribution that ISTJs...

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Looking at the Strong Scales as Puzzle Pieces

Feb 4, 2016 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

When we have a client with unique results on the Strong Interest Inventory® assessment, we practitioners can find ourselves doing a double take … or at least some serious head scratching.

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16 Types in the Workplace

Feb 2, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

I’ve started off 2016 with a lot on my plate. I earned my Foundations of Dialogue Education Certification while also facilitating several MBTI® and FIRO® workshops. It has been a fun and busy way to get the year going, and I don’t see it letting up. That’s a good thing! In a recent training I was asked by a participant, “Which four preferences contribute most to an organization?” Interesting question I thought, before answering, “Any preference can contribute to an organization, and any preference can present challenges.” The question, “What do each of the 16 four-letter types bring to the workplace?” has led me to my next series on type. Stay tuned… If you are looking for an exclusive thought leadership event to further your MBTI training, check out our upcoming 2016 MBTI® Users Conference. Registration is now open. I’ve already heard from a few of you who have signed up. I look forward to seeing you then! Want to read more about my experience at the 2015 MBTI® Users Conference? Check out my last blog series: Is It Over Already? I’m Next! Part 2 I’m Next! MBTI® Tool and Influencing—The Power of the Mental Processes Connecting with Food and Drink MBTI® Criticism Type and Influence Ford Motor Company and the MBTI® Framework Global MBTI® Panel What Lunch? There’s More? Up Next I’m Impressed The Late Show with Stephen Colbert So It Begins 2015 MBTI® Users Conference...

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JDSU Uses Personality Typology during Management Empowerment Camps

Jan 28, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

By Michael Segovia, Lead MBTI Certification Trainer. This case study originally appears in Industrial and Commercial Training Magazine here.  Abstract Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to gauge the success of optical product maker JDSU’s effort to engage Human Resources as a strategic partner in building an international company culture using training in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to bring diverse teams together with a common management language for discussing interpersonal and team dynamics. Design/methodology/approach – The study relied on interviews with managers, employees, and designers of JDSU’s Empowerment Camp on their experience of improvement in management and communication in the organization. Findings – With a common language for discussing communication, management, and interpersonal interaction centered around insights derived from management’s training in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator through the Empowerment Camp, members of the organization encountered a more unified and effective management approach across JDSU’s diverse web of international offices. Originality/value – This paper is the first to explore a company’s effort to engage Human Resources as a strategic partner in building an international company culture. JDSU has its roots in the exciting technological breakthroughs of the mid-1990s internet boom. The company became a household name among the Silicon Valley set as the internet grew explosively. However, after its initial meteoric rise, JDSU experienced the same kind of turmoil as many other internet companies in the early 2000s. It has since turned around and seen a resurgence in its chosen areas of focus and expertise: developing innovative optical products and advanced technologies for the telecom, datacom, laser, and anti-counterfeiting markets. The Problem As JDSU took on the new challenge of scaling its innovation, Sharon Parker, VP of Human Resources at JDSU, was looking to make some cultural changes. To help the company scale, she believed that Human Resources could be a strategic partner to the business in bringing about effective change through cultural transformation. JDSU would desperately need cultural alignment between the executive strategy and the general employee population. Managers serve as the linchpin between an organization’s leaders and its workforce, yet JDSU offered no consistent, company-wide management training for those very people. While many managers had been promoted on the basis of their technical proficiencies, they had not received the training they needed to create a team culture of alignment with organizational leadership. The Solution Sharon turned to the talent development team at JDSU to create a program that would address the need for consistent manager training. In response, Juls Snowden, a manager development expert with 25 years of experience, created “Managing at JDSU: Empowerment Camp.”...

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Is It Over Already?

Jan 26, 2016 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

It has been a great three days (one day of pre-conference and two days in conference). The final conference session was a keynote by Wayne Cascio, Reynolds Distinguished Chair in Global Leadership, titled “Workplace Challenges: What’s Next?” This was a perfect end to the conference, and it offered great insight on what is coming down the pike. Topics addressed included: Extreme longevity—people are living longer; by 2025 the number of people over the age of 60 will increase by 70% The rise of the smart machine—there has been so much development around robots and co-bots (robots intended to interact with humans in a shared workspace), reflecting an even higher demand to be connected in some way all the time The computational world—big data proves that people of similar MBTI® preferences tend to gravitate toward particular careers The growth of teams—at least 80% of us function as part of a team at least part of the time; the MBTI assessment is widely used in team building to help team members appreciate the differences between themselves and their teammates Social media—who isn’t on some form of social media? OK, there may still be a few, but on average, across all MBTI types 65% use Facebook, with those with preferences for ISTJ having the lowest percentage at 51.6% and those who prefer ENFJ having the highest at 75.5%. Living in a globally connected world—the challenges of bringing together business, technology, and culture If you would like more information on the upcoming 2016 MBTI® Users Conference, click here. Registration is open. I’ve already heard from a few of you who have signed up. I look forward to seeing you then! Want to read more? Check out my previous blogs in this series: I’m Next! Part 2 I’m Next! MBTI® Tool and Influencing—The Power of the Mental Processes Connecting with Food and Drink MBTI® Criticism Type and Influence Ford Motor Company and the MBTI® Framework Global MBTI® Panel What Lunch? There’s More? Up Next I’m Impressed The Late Show with Stephen Colbert So It Begins 2015 MBTI® Users Conference  ...

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