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Leadership and the Sensing–Feeling (SF) Process Pair

May 23, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with SF preferences (ISFJs, ISFPs, ESFPs, ESFJs) typically take a “thoughtful helping of others” approach to leadership. They consider how the factual information they provide (who, what when, why, where) might help others in a here-and-now way. They tend to have a supportive and practical leadership style, offering information that can be useful today instead of someday. If SF informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your detailed and helpful leadership style, but others may find your approach too restrictive and closed to new, less than concrete ideas. Remember, some people feel empowered when they get to explore possibilities, whether they act on these ideas or not. If ST informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble making your big-picture idea a reality. Try not to get annoyed when your ST leader wants you take a more practical and grounded approach to it. Let’s take a quick look at each of these four-letter MBTI types and their leadership attributes: ISFJ Preference Leaders Not one of the more common leadership types, people who prefer ISFJ make up almost 4% of leaders around the world. By the way, they make up almost 14% of the general population (the highest percentage of any of the types in the general population). Their preferences may help them take information from what they have learned in the past and apply it in the present in practical ways that are considerate of others. During initial stress they may trust only past experience, using language like “that’s not how we do it around here” and have difficulty considering new ways to tackle problems. ISFP Preference Leaders One of the rarest of the leadership types, people who prefer ISFP make up almost 2% of leaders around the world. Now, just because we don’t find a lot of people who prefer ISFP in leadership positions does not mean they cannot make outstanding leaders—we know that leaders often promote others who are just like them. Their preferences may help them stick to values that are important to leading an organization, as well as understand the practical reality of new ideas. During initial stress we might find them withdrawing emotionally and sinking into self-pity. ESFP Preference Leaders Another one of the rarest leadership...

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Leadership and the Sensing–Thinking (ST) Process Pair

May 16, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

People with ST preferences (ISTJs, ISTPs, ESTPs, ESTJs) typically take a “let’s get it done” approach to leadership. They want to tackle the task at hand and prefer to jump right in to get things right the first time. In fact, they are likely to be annoyed by discussion of matters that don’t directly relate to the task. They prefer to move on from anything they consider superfluous and get to what “needs” to get done. If ST informs your leadership style, you may want to consider how this approach is affecting members of your team. Some of them may appreciate your steady focus on the bottom line, but others may find your approach too task focused and therefore unappreciative of the people getting the task done. Remember, people are always a key factor of any successful undertaking. If ST informs your leader’s leadership style, try to remember that mimicking this approach can be really helpful when you’re having trouble focusing on the factual details of the problem to be addressed. And try not to take it personally or assume that your ST boss doesn’t like you just because she doesn’t seem interested in anything beyond the task at hand. Let’s take a quick look at the four MBTI personality types that have these two middle letters and find out how prominent they are as a percentage of leadership as well as a quick overview of their strengths and weaknesses: ISTJ Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer ISTJ make up over 15% of leaders. Their preferences may help them remember data and details from past experiences and then use them to make logical and efficient decisions. During initial stress, however, they may seem a bit rigid and not open to new ideas. ISTP Preference Leaders While not one of the most common leadership types, people who prefer ISTP are not the rarest either—they make up 5% of leaders around the world. Their preferences may help them during decision making better analyze both the pros and cons, and focus on the practicality of new ideas. During initial stress, however, they may start to look overly critical and stubborn. ESTJ Preference Leaders We find many leaders of this type not just in the U.S. but all over the world. People who prefer ESTJ make up...

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Myers-Briggs Personality Types and Leadership

May 11, 2017 in MBTI Talk | 0 comments

A couple of years back I wrote a blog series on type and leadership, and I’m now following that up with a few additional ideas focusing on the MBTI® process pairs: ST, SF, NF, and NT. While the T–F and J–P preference pairs are the ones most often explored in relation to leadership (maybe I’ll write about the TJ, TP, FJ, and FP pairs next), I still like looking at the middle letters of people’s four-letter type the most. As you consider the content of this next series, remember that people of any type can be a successful leader if they have the motivation. Each type just leads in a different way. As we teach in our MBTI® Certification Program, the best leaders are those who know how to flex to the needs of their followers. I can think of times in my past when I was seen as a wonderful leader by some and a not-so-wonderful leader by others. A lot of it had to do with how willing I was to flex to the needs of the people I was leading. By the way, CPP has an excellent booklet on this very topic, titled Introduction to Myers-Briggs® Type and Leadership and a new ready-to-present training workshop: Leader Development: An MBTI® Step I™ Type Training Workshop In addition, CPP has a lot of complimentary resources surrounding MBTI personality type and leadership. A few of these are listed below if you want to brush up on your MBTI type and leadership knowledge as we go through the series, or if perhaps you want to check out these resources for the first time. Coaching Transformational Leaders with the Myers-Briggs Assessment [white paper] Creating Inspirational Leaders: Beginning to Build Competencies in Today’s Leaders [webinar recording and slides] Leadership Development within the Organization [short video] Leadership Longevity: Addressing Needs Throughout the Employee Life Cycle [webinar recording] How Personality Type Affects Leadership Style [Fast Company article] Stay tuned for the first of four posts on type and leadership in this blog series …  ...

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Upcoming webinar: Build the Workforce of Tomorrow

May 3, 2017 in Eye on Edu | 0 comments

“96% of students completed the SuperStrong assessment, whereas most assessments typically achieve a 75–80% completion rate” – Data gathered from a recent First-Year Experience course at a four-year university With that kind of completion rate, it’s no wonder that our newest offering, the SuperStrong™ tool, derived from the gold-standard Strong Interest Inventory® assessment, is gaining a lot of attention within 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities. Join us for a free webinar to learn about how this mobile-enabled, self-interpretable tool, which takes only 5-7 minutes to complete, can help your students choose the right education and career paths for their particular interests. In this 45-minute webinar (30-min presentation and 15-min Q&A), Chris Mackey, SVP of CPP Innovation Labs, will show you: How interest and personality data are being used to help schools overcome organizational issues, such as student retention and engagement How customer needs led to the development of the SuperStrong assessment The science behind the assessment, which ensures the accuracy of the results Real examples of ways advisers, counselors, and teachers are using the SuperStrong tool to drive student success All attendees will receive a free promo code to try the SuperStrong assessment. Register for one of the two time slots: Tuesday, May 23, 11 am–11:45am Wednesday, May 24, 10am–10:45am Can’t make either one? Don’t worry – if you can’t be there, register anyway and we’ll send you the recording...

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Upcoming webinar: Build the Workforce of Tomorrow

May 3, 2017 in CPP Connect | 0 comments

“96% of students completed the SuperStrong assessment, whereas most assessments typically achieve a 75–80% completion rate” – Data gathered from a recent First-Year Experience course at a four-year university With that kind of completion rate, it’s no wonder that our newest offering, the SuperStrong™ tool, derived from the gold-standard Strong Interest Inventory® assessment, is gaining a lot of attention within 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities. Join us for a free webinar to learn about how this mobile-enabled, self-interpretable tool, which takes only 5-7 minutes to complete, can help your students choose the right education and career paths for their particular interests. In this 45-minute webinar (30-min presentation and 15-min Q&A), Chris Mackey, SVP of CPP Innovation Labs, will show you: How interest and personality data are being used to help schools overcome organizational issues, such as student retention and engagement How customer needs led to the development of the SuperStrong assessment The science behind the assessment, which ensures the accuracy of the results Real examples of ways advisers, counselors, and teachers are using the SuperStrong tool to drive student success All attendees will receive a free promo code to try the SuperStrong assessment. Register for one of the two time slots: Tuesday, May 23, 11 am–11:45am Wednesday, May 24, 10am–10:45am Can’t make either one? Don’t worry – if you can’t be there, register anyway and we’ll send you the recording...

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